Money Race: Final Edition

FEC post-election reports were due yesterday. Here are the results:

2nd District

Big re-election winner Rep. Joe Courtney ends the race having raised $92,651.95 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $2,335,216.49 net (excluding refunds) for the whole cycle. Of that, he spent a total of $1,673,550.54 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $677,332.08 cash on hand on 12/4 with no debts.

His opponent Sean Sullivan raised $11,993.00 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $395,948.26 total (there were no refunds reported). Of that, he spent a total of $388,939.00 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $3,511.87 on hand as of 12/4 with no debts.

4th District

Winner Jim Himes ends the race having raised $366,299.37 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $3,312,493.70 net (excluding refunds) for the whole cycle. Of that, he spent a total of $3,462,396.98 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $76,193.58 cash on hand on 12/4 with $365,000.00 in debts. Himes loaned his campaign $350,000, most of it during the last month of the campaign.

Defeated incumbent Rep. Chris Shays raised $374,209.64 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $3,645,982.93 total for the whole cycle (excluding refunds). Of that, he spent a total of $3,298,024.97 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $301,447.65 on hand as of 12/4 with $205,652.40 in debts.

Update: Shays is reporting that there may have been some kind of fraud in his financial records. It looks like the work of a single former employee.

5th District

Rep. Chris Murphy ends his successful re-election campaign having raised $158,862.04 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $3,012,056.85 net (excluding refunds) for the whole cycle. Of that, he spent a total of $2,812,859.30 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $142,613.19 cash on hand on 12/4 with zero debts.

His opponent, David Cappiello, raised $32,687.00 between 10/16 and 11/24. He raised $1,028,416.55 total for the whole cycle (excluding refunds), plus an additional $305,440.68 from another committee. Of that, he spent a total of $1,299,429.48 (excluding offsets) for the whole cycle, and had $42,059.24 on hand as of 12/4 with zero debts.

Conclusions

I think the lesson here is that if you want to win a race for Congress these days in Connecticut, you’ll need somewhere in the neighborhood of $3 million. Also, note that Joe Courtney ends up in the best shape of any candidate, ending a truly terrific cycle for him.

Sullivan’s filing shows just how far behind he was the entire cycle. Cappiello did a lot better, but still not nearly well enough to come close to Murphy. Himes and Shays were very evenly matched in fundraising, which allowed Himes to get the better of Shays during a Democratic year.

Advertisements

14 responses to “Money Race: Final Edition

  1. The figures for Obama and McCain are: Obama, $750 million; McCain $84 million. So much for campaign finance reform, which McCain accepted. Obama reneged on his promise to accept “public money.”

  2. AndersonScooper

    Don, that’s just a lot of crap.

    If McCain believed so much in public financing, why did he opt out of it during the primaries, — after it was clear he’d be the victor?

  3. AS,

    Which sentence or phrase or partial phrase in the 3 line graph above is, to use your felicitous turn of pharse, “a lot of crap?” Certainly your not disputing that McCain is one of the co-authors of McCain-Feingold. You’re not disputing the figures. So, where’s the LOC?

  4. AndersonScooper

    The load of crap you’re peddling is that McCain is a staunch proponent of campaign finance reform, and somehow Obama is not.

    For the GOP primary, McCain said he would commit to public financing, then he didn’t. Whoops.

    And if you were to count up the totality of money raised and spent, (candidate committees, national party committees, state party committees), the numbers wouldn’t be the $750M to $84M your highlighting.

    Finally, do you care that you’re quoting Obama’s total take for both the 50-state primary and the general, against McCain’s post-September convention spending? It’s not apples to apples, and you should know that.

  5. AndersonScooper

    Ruh-Roh.

    Sounds like someone in Shays’ inner circle did some major leagure embezzling.

    Can’t wait to learn more about this:
    http://www.courant.com/news/local/statewire/hc-ap-ct-shays-financesdec05,0,226909.story

  6. AS,

    McCain wrote the campaign finance laws; one generally doesn’t do that sort of thing if one is not serious about campaign finance reform. Obama first saiddhe would accept publioc financing and then declined to do so. McCain did. That accounts for the disparity in figures. And if you doubt them, your quarrel is with Bloomberg, here: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=washingtonstory&sid=abPrh.QKY5Tk

    All in all, Obama spent four times as much as McCain.

    My guess is that the next Republican presidential candidate will not be warm on public finacing, which is pretty much what implied in the first posting. If you think differently… well, I’m all in favor of people being their potty old selves, I suppose.

  7. Here are the figures: “Obama brought in $291 million between Sept. 1 and Nov. 24 and spent $349 million, helped by funds left over from a primary battle that began in February 2007, his campaign said. McCain, a Republican senator from Arizona, spent $78.9 million of the $84.1 million he received in public financing.”

  8. Obama’s communication director whooping it up with Obama’s new Secretary of state. All in good fun. http://voices.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/12/04/one_more_question.html

  9. [quote comment=”39011″] Obama first saiddhe would accept publioc financing and then declined to do so. McCain did. [/quote]

    What he didn’t do is tell the FEC he would accept them or accept loans on the premise that primary-season public funds would be granted.

  10. Matt,

    Granted, but it hardly alters the point I aws making, which is: accepting public financing at the presidential level makes you, relatively speaking, a pauper. Obama was able to raise more cash than McCain because he didn’t accept the restrictions. Future Republican presidential nominees might want to abandon the sinking public financing ship. I don’t see how anyone can argue otherwise. But some of you guys are very inventive. My views on reformers haven’t changed since here: http://donpesci.blogspot.com/2004/11/future-of-political-parties-and.html

    What’s up with the gropers (see above)? Hillary said she was happy that the groper was taking an interest in the Secretary of State position, which was mildly amusing. I certainly says something about her that the rigiors of campaigning have not dented her sense of humor — she’s gonna need it.

  11. AndersonScooper

    Good News! Corrupt LA Democrat William Jefferson loses in LA-02.

    Incredibly, the district has a PVI of D+28.

    Anyway the Repub challenger Cao should have a fun two years in DC. Who knows, maybe he’ll decide he wants to stay awhile, — and switch parties.

    Good riddance to the disgraceful William Jefferson.

  12. [quote comment=”39059″]Good News! Corrupt LA Democrat William Jefferson loses in LA-02.

    Incredibly, the district has a PVI of D+28.

    Anyway the Repub challenger Cao should have a fun two years in DC. Who knows, maybe he’ll decide he wants to stay awhile, — and switch parties.

    Good riddance to the disgraceful William Jefferson.[/quote]

    Now if we can just get rid of the pox on CT — Chris “not favorable mortgage rate” Dudd.

  13. Cao’s win was a surprise. I can’t imagine he has that seat come January 3, 2011. However, it’s amazing how both parties stick by their own corrupt guys, to their detriment. Had the Republican party dumped Ted Stevens in Alaska for anyone else, they would have held that Senate seat (especially with Palin on top of the ticket). Had the Democrats dumped Jefferson, there’s no way a Republican would have won that race. Some Republican leaders knew about Foley way earlier: they should have dumped him when they had the chance.

    In the long term, it probably would have been better for the GOP to have lost this race. Jefferson would then have become a big distraction for Pelosi et al. She’s probably grateful that she doesn’t have to deal with his issues anymore.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s