Murphy Appointed to Energy and Commerce Committee

Rep. Chris Murphy has been named to the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee–a spot both Rep. Rosa DeLauro and Rep. John Larson lobbied for him to have. From a press release:

Murphy released the following statement on his selection:

“I am thrilled to have been appointed to a committee that will allow me to play a major role in expanding access to health care, combating global warming, and making our country truly energy independent. In particular, health care reform has always been an issue central to my public service, and this appointment gives me an opportunity to continue the work I started as Chair of the Public Health Committee in Hartford.

“For the first time in over a decade, Connecticut will have a seat on one of the most influential committees in Congress. Under the leadership of Chairman Henry Waxman and President-Elect Obama, the Energy and Commerce Committee will be at the center of the most important policy debates of the next two years. I look forward to being Connecticut’s voice at the table as we construct landmark health care and energy reform legislation.

Murphy will now have the opportunity to have a voice on major health care and economic legislation.

Connecticut is well-represented on major House committees. Rep. Larson sits on Ways and Means, Rep. DeLauro sits on both Appropriations and Budget, and Rep. Courtney sits on Armed Services.

Advertisements

3 responses to “Murphy Appointed to Energy and Commerce Committee

  1. This is pretty major. That committee is going to be front and center on most of the Obama agenda….he played a good hand here.

  2. making our country truly energy independent.

    There’s simply no way that this is going to happen anytime soon. Seriously. I know, lots of Republicans and Democrats alike like to say they’re working for energy independence. But it’s not going to happen soon, if ever.

    Roughly speaking, we produce about 8 million barrels of oil a day and we use about 20 million bpd. That’s a huge gap. Coal is where we get about half of our electrical power from now, but that’s hated by the environmentalists. Nuclear has incredibly long lead times from the planning and permitting process. Wind can generate some electricity, but wind towers face local opposition, and in peak demand periods, wind is often unreliable. Solar isn’t viable for much yet (it’s really only good when it’s inconvenient to tap into a grid). Like it or not, we’re going to be using lots of oil for the foreseeable future, especially for transportation.

  3. [quote post=”2416″]There’s simply no way that this is going to happen anytime soon. Seriously. I know, lots of Republicans and Democrats alike like to say they’re working for energy independence. But it’s not going to happen soon, if ever.[/quote]

    Whoa there, cool your heels. I don’t think anyone is promising energy independence within one term, any more than Kennedy was promising a man on the moon within two years. Everyone knows your factoids by now — the idea is that it should remain an overriding policy goal, regardless of the price of gas.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s