A Future for Mass Transit

Since I know you can’t get enough of me talking about transportation, I’ve got a take on a possible future for mass transit in this Sunday’s Courant.

Warning: It’s kind of optimistic.

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7 responses to “A Future for Mass Transit

  1. AndersonScooper

    Genghis, I never knew you were such a pie-in-the-sky liberal.

    Connecticut lacks both the density and the growth to support your light-rail fantasy. Plus, our winters are cold enough to ensure that people are unwilling to walk 10-15 minutes to get to the rail-heads.

    A smarter emphasis would be on commuter cars with, at some point, the ability to “pod-up” on our Interstates and railroad tracks. It’d be great if I had a light weight two-seater auto, that could attach to a caravan, and/or train, on its way from New Haven to Boston. I could nap, watch TV, or blog en route…

  2. Genghis, I never knew you were such a pie-in-the-sky liberal.

    Well, I knew that … what I didn’t know was AS actually has some contact with economic and social reality.

    There is some some federal work going on to make cars and highways smarter to more effectively and safely use the roads we have.

  3. Pie-in-the-sky liberal or not, I liked the idea! I do wish there were more links to the Farmington Valley, since that is a huge bottle neck. By the way, there are people who take the train to New Haven and walk 10-15 minutes. I know some of them, and some of them are liberals too! Loved the fantasy! Thanks!

  4. Once we have a nation full of cars like this and design rail to accommodate moving 1000’s of them around quickly, we’ll see a mass transit system that will get real use going from suburb to small city.

    Until then, aside from areas where driving is so horrible that it’s worth the trouble to take a train or bus; it will continue to attract no interest save for a relatively small group of mass transit proponents.

    That most proponents sound too much like those that seek “reasonable gun control” which we all know really means total ban; I remain suspect that somewhere down the line those seeking horrific spending on mass transit really wish to ban personal use of the automobile.

  5. Mr. Conn,

    I enjoyed your article. I like ideas that make me think about moving in the right direction, unlike a lot of the “conventional wisdom” that is taking our country off the cliff.

    Your map was very interesting, but I believe the proper the proper build-up of transit is to create high density local community transit that has walking access of less than 5 minutes. Only then can we sensibly connect these nodes in the light rail branches like you mapped out in the Courant.

  6. Connecticut lacks both the density and the growth to support your light-rail fantasy. Plus, our winters are cold enough to ensure that people are unwilling to walk 10-15 minutes to get to the rail-heads.

    Exactly right — you need high enough density to sustain constant foot traffic between the stations and nearby attractions and residences. Hartford may have the density to support transit like this, but are you going to get up and tell your zoning board that it’s time to create some Hartford-like population density in Enfield?

  7. Exactly right — you need high enough density to sustain constant foot traffic between the stations and nearby attractions and residences. Hartford may have the density to support transit like this, but are you going to get up and tell your zoning board that it’s time to create some Hartford-like population density in Enfield?

    Thank you!

    Finally someone from the left that “gets it”.

    I took the bus into Edinbourgh Scotland from Falkirk in August; we’d still be there had I not run into a fellow freemason who got us back.

    Mass transit is a fiasco.

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