Amann In, Williams Out

Jim Amann officially announced his bid for governor tonight down in Bridgeport in front of about 400 supporters. Amann in the first Democrat to officially announce his bid. That’s both good and bad. Good, in that he’s in early and can work to raise his visibility; and bad in that he just completed his major news event for this year.

Senate President Pro Tem Don Williams, however, has decided against running. He made the announcement to his caucus, then sent the following out via release:

“I shared with my caucus members today that I will not be a candidate for governor in 2010. We’re in the midst of the worst economic crisis in our lifetime. My colleagues have put their trust in me to serve as President of the Senate and I will need to devote all of my time and energy to help Connecticut meet the unprecedented challenges we face. I look forward to working with my colleagues in the legislature and the governor to help families weather this storm and position Connecticut to emerge stronger in the future.”

Which begs the question: who is the liberal candidate in the race? A few folks we know stood outside the Klein holding signs that said things like “The Lamont Majority Says Hello,” but who will the Lamont/Obama majority of Democrats actually vote for?

Meanwhile, Jodi Rell was in Bridgeport today, but decided to skip Amann’s announcement. The political observation of the day goes to Lennie Grimaldi at Only in Bridgeport, who says of Rell:

Jodi is the Tooth Fairy of state politics. A little whiskey on those gums and all is forgiven.

Awesome.

[poll id=”8″]

Advertisements

12 responses to “Amann In, Williams Out

  1. Which begs the question: who is the liberal candidate in the race? A few folks we know stood outside the Klein holding signs that said things like “The Lamont Majority Says Hello,” but who will the Lamont/Obama majority of Democrats actually vote for?

    This is a very interesting point. There really is not, dare I say, an “Establishment Democrat” in the race (My how things and definitions change in two short years!). At least not yet. Certainly Malloy has some work and convincing to do and does not have labor. Perhaps most interesting will be to see if Bysiewcz can make traction. I know little about her record in the House but she seems to me to have walked the fine line of friend to all as SOTS, but is she that candidate?

    I think the real elephant in the room is Lamont himself. Reports out of Denver this summer was that Lamont told people he was going to give the top spot a run. But much is said at a convention. After Denver all I’ve heard is that he wants to be the state treasurer. Still, I would imagine that he has the luxury to wait a while to see how the races sort out. Especially if he is going out of pocket again.

    Final point- the citizens election fund is terrible for primaries. 1.25M sounds like a lot, but it isn’t when you are running for Governor. Didn’t Malloy and Destefano spend about 2m each? Postage and air time alone have gone up enough to jack up prices another couple 100k.

    Final Final point, as a democrat I really wonder what our chances will be in a Nov. 1 on 1 with Jodi after people react to the state throwing down 3.75M PLUS for a Democratic primary, esp. if the unemployment numbers don’t turn around in the next 18 months.

  2. One would think with the public financing of elections would invite a slew of candidates into the race. I am slightly surprised Democrats are only fielding three major contenders. It doesn’t look like Wyman will jump in the race and DeStefano is unlikely to as well.

    Perhaps Senator LeBeau will be the great liberal hope?

  3. Which begs the question: who is the liberal candidate in the race? A few folks we know stood outside the Klein holding signs that said things like “The Lamont Majority Says Hello,” but who will the Lamont/Obama majority of Democrats actually vote for?

    Ahh and the labeling and segmenting begins. Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone fit into nice little boxes? Then we wouldn’t even need elections, we could just count the boxes every year.

    I supported Lamont and Obama and consider myself a ‘pragmatic progressive.’ To me that means I am more than willing to pay more taxes in order to support worthwhile programs and services. (Note – a friend in politics whom I respect as much, if not more than any other once told me, “Taxes are the dues we pay to live in the greatest country on earth.”) But don’t tax me so much that I can’t do business or support my family. I believe in ‘fairness’ in government and policy, but recognize that there are differences of opinion as to what exactly is ‘fair.’

    I believe we need to invest in our future – in education, our small businesses, our healthcare system (yes, I support healthcare for ALL). I believe in an honest wage for an honest day’s work. I demand accountability, abhor corruption and believe party labels be damned if you are corrupt. By every account but one I am as socially liberal as they come (The exception is I support a ‘truth-in-sentencing’ law).

    I support Dan Malloy for Governor.

  4. So then, when does Lamont intend to announce for governor. Sooner rather than later one hopes. And if Amann is chosen by the Democrat nomination convention, will Lamont (right now) pledge to support his candidacy? A breathless public wants to know.

  5. … if Amann is chosen by the Democrat nomination convention, will Lamont (right now) pledge to support his candidacy? A breathless public wants to know.

    Don, why would Lamont need to pledge his support for anyone (right now)? If Amann is chosen at the convention next year, I’d guess Lamont would support him. He’s not in the game of political payback.

  6. Don, why would Lamont need to pledge his support for anyone (right now)? If Amann is chosen at the convention next year, I’d guess Lamont would support him. He’s not in the game of political payback.

    Lamont isn’t the game of blindly supporting whoever wins at convention, either. He would’ve supported Joe Lieberman for the U.S. Senate in 2006 if that were the case. Even if Amann were to win the convention and faces off with Malloy in a primary, I think Lamont would support the candidate who a) would make a better governor and b) promised to support the Democratic nominee in 2006.

    I think Dan Malloy will emerge as the progressive in this race, and will offer quite the contrast to Amann. The first candidate for governor in 2006 to come out in support of gay marriage against the Speaker of the House who voted against civil unions. Dan’s “union problem” is simply a product of running a city and having the responsibility of making tough decisions that Amann and Bysiewicz have never faced. That’s exactly why Malloy is best equipped to be Connecticut’s governor.

  7. Lamont, opting out of public financing, is probably the Democrats’ only remote shot at beating Gov. Rell in 2010. For goodness’ sakes – 2/3 of DEMOCRATS in CT approve of her right now!

  8. Bob,

    As I recall, it was a point that came up in discussion during the Lieberman-Lamont race. You might recall that prominent politicians hedged their bets on the question, causing some confusion as to whether of not they were proper Democrats.

    After the primaries, some Democrats who had backed Lieberman climbed aboard the Lamont bandwagon. I thought it might be useful to get a jump on it this time, to prevent confusion and red faces. If Democrats are prepared to back the nominee or primary winner after the primaries, surely it would do no harm to get them to commit to this proposition before the primaries: I will support for governor the Democrat who is nominated at the convention; and if there is a primary, I will support the primary winner against any possible independent runner. This way we can all avoid unsavory recriminations.

  9. It’s good to have your assurances. But it would be better to have Lamont’s assurances.

  10. As I recall, it was a point that came up in discussion during the Lieberman-Lamont race. You might recall that prominent politicians hedged their bets on the question, causing some confusion as to whether of not they were proper Democrats.

    The question only came into play after Lieberman lost in the primary to Lamont, and then selfishly decided to run as an independent because he couldn’t stomach the idea of a life outside of the Senate. Those Democrats who decided to “stick with Joe” are responsible to a large degree why
    we’re currently stuck with Joe.

    Lamont doesn’t have to support anyone at this point. I suspect he might throw his support to one of the Democrats around the convention if he wants; and if there’s a primary and his guy loses, you can pretty much bet the house that he’ll support the winner.

  11. Ned Lamont (who I proudly voted for twice, btw) was a one-issue candidate who would get nowhere in a governors race. He did a great service to the party and the state by taking a stand against Lieberman and, more specifically, about Iraq but that’s about it. Is he a smart guy? Yes. But do I see him in the the capitol tackling state issues? No and neither would a lot of average CT folks.

    Malloy, despite the irrelevant Q poll, is the clear frontrunner in the Dem primary and will get the support of the Lamont crowd in my opinion. I’d rather vote for Rell than Amann and Susie B. doesn’t come to mind as being “progressive” simply because she doesn’t deal with everyday issues in her role as SoS.

    In the end, my money is on Malloy to get the Lamont votes.

  12. I had no idea Malloy staffers were such prolific commenters on this blog.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s