Quote of the Day

“I think if Coach Calhoun had the opportunity right now, he would welcome a do over and not have that embarrassing display.”

–Gov. Rell, reacting to Jim Calhoun’s less-than-civil conversation with Ken Krayeske.

The UCONN men’s baskeball, football and women’s basketball coaches are the state’s three highest-paid employees.

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16 responses to “Quote of the Day

  1. Easy for her to say, as she had the state police apparatus to keep Ken safely locked up during events where he might have been embarrassing.

    Calhoun doesn’t need a do-over, he just has to wait for the blow over.

  2. AndersonScooper

    “Not one dime!”

    (smugly), “I make more than that…”

    “Are you that stupid?” [KK– “yeah, I am”]

    “Shut up…”

  3. Easy for her to say, as she had the state police apparatus to keep Ken safely locked up during events where he might have been embarrassing.

    Don’t confuse someone who’s little more than a cartoon character, like Ken Krayeske, with real life.

    Jodi had NO idea the nit-wit was locked up at all.

    Here’s what KEN DIXON, a real live journalist had to say:

    Connecticut Post

    Ken Krayeske, pseudo- journalist, itinerant rabble-rouser and impotent political provocateur, is no poster boy for the First Amendment. And yet, too many issues around his arrest and confinement by Hartford police really stink to high heaven.
    First, beware of people who call themselves “journalists.” It’s a highfalutin appellation. Real journalists are too busy working, gathering information to share with readers, to cop existential ‘tudes.

    I know a journalist who’s in Baghdad right now and nowhere near the relative safety of the Green Zone. I hope he’s not bleeding somewhere as I write this. He calls himself a reporter, not a journalist.

    Krayeske, whose resume reads like the table of contents for “A Slacker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” is no journalist.

    Note that Dixon shows up on PBS shows such as OTR (On The Record) I don’t think Krayeske’s ever been approached by the show.

  4. Krayeske is, as Dixon noted, impotent. And I was deeply moved by the most honest moment of the press conference when Calhoun asked him if he was really that stupid. He admirably acknowledged that he was.

    But Calhoun, a truculent sphincter of the first order, and generous donor to liberal Democrats, certainly can’t part with any of that money… he “wants to retire some day.”

    Should be sooner than later if you ask me. I don’t give a flying f*** about what he thinks he has done for UConn.

  5. Krayeske, whose resume reads like the table of contents for “A Slacker’s Guide to the Galaxy,” is no journalist.

    But he is. He has a picture on his website to prove it 😉

  6. I’m just sick to death of people marginalizing the guy who simply asked the coach a question.

    The other day, Ken Dixon wrote a really nice column about the failure of the AAAC to produce an annual report on traffic stops motivated by racial profiling, and I complimented Dixon on it with a letter to the editor in the Post… so I have no ax to grind against Dixon here. Not a bad guy. But he was way off base about Krayeske in the 2007 piece quoted by ACR above, and I responded to that in 2007 with a letter to the editor that was printed in the Post. Unfortunately, the letter isn’t available online at the Post. It has been reprinted by both myleftnutmeg and the cooljustice report. But I’m just going to apologize to Dixon for the sarcastic tone of the note and its reprint here, particularly since I’ve read some good things Dixon’s written since then. But it’s worth noting this response from 2007 because the situation is not all that different with the Calhoun incident.

    Here’s my letter:

    Hooray for Ken Dixon! It appears the Connecticut Post’s State Capitol reporter has abandoned the First Amendment in order to reveal his loathing for freelance reporter and activist Ken Krayeske. Maybe it’s time Dixon read up on our freedom of speech and the role of the reporter in our society. Clearly, he doesn’t understand the concept.

    Dixon’s Feb. 4 column headlined, “Plenty of fingers can be pointed in Krayeske issue,” was a hatchet job and showed a real lack of insight into the ramifications of Krayeske’s arrest during Gov. M. Jodi Rell’s inaugural parade a few weeks ago.

    Dixon gives us an over-the-top look at his motives with constant use of negative language about Krayeske, including “pseudo-journalist, itinerant rabble-rouser, and impotent political provocateur,” “weird intensity in the field,” “slacker,” and, “blahg,” which, for those of you who aren’t yet Internet-savvy, is a print-media sneer at Krayeske’s blog.

    Dixon needs to realize that Krayeske, like him or not, is counted among those who have elevated themselves to that lofty, “highfalutin appellation” of reporter. There is no licensing for newspaper reporters, no legal requirement that we sacrifice any political agenda we may possess for the concept of fairness in any opinion piece. We’re asked to be accurate and fair. That’s about it.

    Reporters who think Krayeske doesn’t get to be in their club because he has worked as an activist are fooling themselves. They’ve got opinions. I know some who used to contribute cash to political causes while also reporting on politics. Others attend protests and wave signs. Then they pretend none of that happened and go back to work the next day. It’s hypocritical to pretend you don’t have an opinion.

    And by the way, columnists and reporters attend the same news conferences, so it doesn’t make a lot of sense that Dixon lost his “patience” with Krayeske because he had the nerve to ask Rell a question during the event in Windsor. He most certainly did not get “into Rell’s face” at the event, either, based on the description of events from reporters who attended. Those are Dixon’s words, and I think he used his “journalistic license” to embellish the truth a bit.

    But it certainly does seem like Krayeske messed up Dixon’s day in Windsor. Instead of being able to write his story based on the pre-scripted topic of Rell’s news conference and her comments, he probably had to write a story that mentioned the exchange between Krayeske and the governor, and what it was about — Krayeske’s effort to get the Green Party’s ideas into the public discourse. Those ideas seemed to have terrified Republicans and Democrats alike during the campaign.

    Or, maybe Dixon didn’t bother to include that information for his readers. I wonder, did that ego appear when he “arrived” at the Post’s Capitol beat?

    Dixon, it appears, also has a lot of disdain for “civilians.” A good reporter would know that he/she is, in fact, a civilian. Use any label you like — journalist, reporter, photojournalist, freelancer, muckraker — everyone has a right to ask questions, have an opinion, and publish it. Reporters who go to Baghdad choose to do so under extreme risk. They are not drafted, as Dixon might have us believe. But the bottom line here is that being a former employee of the Green Party (Krayeske is a registered Democrat) does not make it OK to detain anyone as a “person of interest.”

    Every reporter has an agenda, particularly those who are up in that “statusphere” where they get to write columns with their picture inset, rather than a simple text byline. Some allow their agendas into their jobs more than others. Krayeske has simply gone into activism as his primary focus in life. He still gets to ask questions and take photographs and call himself a reporter. He gets paid on a per-story basis as a freelancer. I wonder if Dixon has ever done that, or if he understands what it takes to survive in Connecticut’s economy while also attending law school.

    And calling Krayeske a slacker is ridiculous when you consider how many reporters admit they went into the profession simply because they couldn’t do math in school. I guess they’re all slackers, too.

    I’ve known Krayeske for several years and, certainly, his choices on when to take a stand on First Amendment issues have had an impact on his employment. He’ll freely admit that. But Connecticut’s news-gathering community owes him a debt. Part of the reason he is no longer employed as a full-time reporter is because he’s been vocal about the inequities of some of his employers. Several years ago, after working many unpaid hours of overtime at a Journal Register Co. paper, he quit his job and went to the labor department as a whistleblower. Investigators interviewed all of the chain’s in-state employees, and a short time later dozens of reporters, editors, photographers and others received checks in the thousands of dollars.

    So a lot of people in Connecticut’s news business owe Krayeske a debt of gratitude. But he’s not going to be working for any Journal Register Co. publications any time soon, and the company owns most of the state’s newspapers.

    So where does that leave Krayeske? He’ll always be a reporter. It’s in his blood. And that’s fine because anyone can call themselves a reporter. Whether you’re making money or simply doing it as a hobby does not matter. This is America, Mr. Dixon, and when people like you find it “humorous” that Krayeske was held for more than 12 hours on baseless breach of peace and interfering charges, and “hilarious” that his bond was set at $75,000 so that he could neither do his job nor protest, it simply shows your own disconnect from the rest of us “civilians.”

    If Krayeske’s intensity is “weird,” Mr. Dixon, your lack of intensity, with respect to your own rights as a journalist, is “pathetic.’

    Doug Hardy,
    Windsor

    Anyway … that’s a very similar point to what I’d make about Krayeske’s questions to Calhoun the other day. Once again Krayeske made news by upsetting the media “status quo” … he asked a question that offended the coach. Well that’s just too goddamn bad.

  7. I’m just sick to death of people marginalizing the guy who simply asked the coach a question.

    Maybe if had some manners, did you ever consider that?

    He can be as weird as he wants and I’ll gladly defend his to right to be so; he can run around dressed up a turnip costume for all I care.

    But if he used some common courtesy, had a little manners, his whole life would probably change and he might even get taken seriously on occasion.

  8. That’s a fair point and it’s well taken, ACR. Sometimes Krayeske just rubs people the wrong way. However at some level there’s rudeness and then there’s just unwelcome questions. I think it’s an occupational hazard. A thick skin is important. I’m sometimes not so thick skinned myself and am occasionally guilty of … overresponding. But I don’t live in the bubble that Calhoun lives in, and I do give him credit for putting up with a lot of crap over the years — stuff that people don’t get to see so publicly like the thing Saturday. I can’t imagine many of us could stand up for 10 minutes to the kind of public scrutiny that the guy faces every day.

    But the hard question is just that – the hard part of the job – for both reporter and coach. The best advice I ever got from a journalism professor was this:

    Expect to work a lot, expect to make very little money, and expect not to be well liked

    That was from Jon Sandberg, who taught law & libel at UConn back in the late 1980s.

  9. bravo doug. lots of people here are giving ken a hard time, but he got what he wanted out of that fat mouth calhoun, didn’t he? pretty good work for someone you say isn’t a real reporter.

    i’m glad there’s people like ken out there. they expose people like calhoun when the regular press, who are looking to kiss calhoun’s ass, refuse to. like he said, he wouldn’t need to ask those questions if the mainstream media bothered.

  10. i’m glad there’s people like ken out there.

    You miss the point.

    Think what he could do if more doors were open to him.

    That’s not a function of which questions to ask as much as it is simple manners.

    Seriously, the guy should take a Dale Carnegie Course, he’d be 10 times more effective.

    BTW – I agree Calhoun is too arrogant for his own good – or ours.

    I suspect we’ve all met people far more successful (not to mention wealthy) that are an absolute pleasure to deal with.

  11. donk… i’ve been defending krayeske to a fault … that letter was directed at ken dixon for another attack on krayeske in 2007

  12. ACR is right about Krayeske as well, with respect to the effectiveness of diplomacy.

  13. Pity – the issue is out there thanks to Kreyeske – we pay the most to people who stage athletic events . Not to the governor, legislators, commissioners, doctors, educators, professors but people who stage the equivalent of roman gladiatorial games. You all need an attitude adjustment. PS : Good ole boy Calhoun pulls in another $2-3 million in endorsements. They should be shared with Storrs as Storrs provides the stage for their publicity. .

  14. Good ole boy Calhoun pulls in another $2-3 million in endorsements. They should be shared with Storrs as Storrs provides the stage for their publicity. .

    This logic is absurd. If Calhoun was a bad coach, he would be fired immediately, and a successor would replace him. No union could back him up. No endorsement deals would be available. Rather, the converse has happened, and Calhoun has made millions, through hard work and great success. Why anyone thinks it’s a good idea to take that away from him — when he has earned every penny he makes! — is beyond me. Once again, it’s clear that liberals love to penalize success.

    If Ken’s crazy crusade succeeds, see how quickly Calhoun, Auriemma and Edsall run for the hills. Then what? Would you be proud of yourselves then?

  15. If Ken’s crazy crusade succeeds, see how quickly Calhoun, Auriemma and Edsall run for the hills. Then what? Would you be proud of yourselves then?

    You get off on some sports mercenaries tossing a ball through a goal?? I think you and all the rest of the you who see sports as a major part of your lives are pathetic.

  16. ACR is right about Krayeske as well, with respect to the effectiveness of diplomacy.

    Thanks – now if only we can get him to hang around with some well known polite Democrats that might teach him how to get along with the other boy & girls.

    Chris MC, (not a bad guy at all) CT Bob (often hysterically funny) or
    Bruce Rubenstien (who is simply a class act).

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