Open Forum

A new report shows increasingly high incarceration rates, suggesting that tough-on-crime policies don’t actually help keep people out of jail. Obviously what we need is a three strikes law. The article also focuses on what Connecticut’s commissioner of corrections is doing.

People are using Metro-North trains a lot more than they were last year. Ridership is up over 11%.

There will be a hearing on a proposed death penalty ban today.

Connecticut could be headed for even worse cash flow problems, according to the state treasurer.

The health care pooling bill is back.

Lastly: the state is offering incentives for a film studio in South Windsor.

What else is going on?

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12 responses to “Open Forum

  1. “Despite the get-tough sentences enacted in the 1980s and ’90s, increasingly high incarceration rates have failed to significantly reduce recidivism.”

    What about crime? Have these policies reduced crime?

  2. What about crime? Have these policies reduced crime?

    Nope.

    It’s a black hole for tax dollars.

    We just keep spending 40K or more each per-year and wind up with more dysfunctional families and illiterate prison “trade school” grads.
    It’s perfect.

    That so many of these idiots go in illiterate and come out the same way is really amazing isn’t it? After all, while we’ve got them they’re quite literally a captive audience aren’t they?

    Maybe it’s time to promote a few CO’s (Corrections Officers) to positions of rank so those on top will be forced to listen to them.

  3. Nope.

    http://www.disastercenter.com/crime/ctcrime.htm

    Not according to this.

    All crime, particuarly violent crimes, have significantly decreased since these get-tough laws were put on the books in the 1990s.

    Why on earth would we judge these laws by the rate of recidivism? The state is safer because of these laws, and therefore an unqualified success.

  4. Seems like more people are taking the train, that’s for sure. I used to return to Grand Central just a few minutes before my train departs, and usually had no problem finding an aisle seat.

    Nowadays, I get there 10 or more minutes before departure, especially on a Friday afternoon. There’s nothing like being crammed into an inside seat when you’re a bit claustrophobic!

    And last Friday someone had a multi-ride ticket that was about to expire, so he bought everyone in my section a free ride, which was cool. Friendly people on the train.

  5. According tto the Courant Tom Colapietro is proposing a Super Lottery Game to close the deficit. Another No Hard decsions solution offered up by a Democrat.

  6. Joe Sixpack

    The tougher sentencing was not meant to curb recidivisim – it was meant to lock up the violent felons to offer some protection to the public at large. And it works, by reducing violent crime. If it’s not affecting recidivism rates, then we need a real “three strikes” law to put away repeat violent offenders for good.

  7. And last Friday someone had a multi-ride ticket that was about to expire, so he bought everyone in my section a free ride, which was cool. Friendly people on the train.

    The people are usually nice but the train itself is a joke. I do the New Haven to Grand Central routine M-F and I usually can’t get through one week without a delay. Also, for $400 a month, I’d expect the condition of the cars to be a lot better than they are. The PATH train in Jersey or the Metra in Chicago put Metro North to shame. Perhaps with ridership up we can focus on Metro North improvements.

  8. Thomas Hooker

    Sarah Littman has been asked by Greenwich Time management to return to her position as a columnist! Apparently all is forgiven, they made a mistake, and acknowledge her dedicated following.

    Apparently Hearst Newspapers, which operates a virtual newspaper monopoly in southwestern Connecticut, have come to understand that it is simply not good business to load up your newspaper with right-wingers like Ken Dixon and Peter Urban and ignore the progressive voters and subscribers who comprise the majority of our region.

    Welcome back to Sarah Littman.

  9. Bruce Rubenstein

    venility cannot be quelled by legislation, in fact i am convinced that crime will always be with us….no matter how many laws on the books there are..some people will always be criminals.

  10. The people are usually nice but the train itself is a joke. I do the New Haven to Grand Central routine M-F and I usually can’t get through one week without a delay. Also, for $400 a month, I’d expect the condition of the cars to be a lot better than they are. The PATH train in Jersey or the Metra in Chicago put Metro North to shame. Perhaps with ridership up we can focus on Metro North improvements.

    One issue is that Metro North can’t just go out and buy rail cars for the New Haven line. You need cusomized cars for that line, since from GCT to New Rochelle you have a third rail, DC-based electrification. Then in New Rochelle, it switches to an overhead AC-based system. Really a weird way to do things. Excess New Haven line cars can go to the Hudson and Harlem lines but not vice versa.

  11. Thomas said

    it is simply not good business to load up your newspaper with

    Cuts both ways – watch as the NY Times slides into oblivion.

    Bruce Rubenstein said

    venality cannot be quelled by legislation, in fact i am convinced that crime will always be with us….no matter how many laws on the books there are..

    Of course you’re correct.
    Think about it, would we have an increase or decrease in murder if there were no laws against it?

    Aside from a quick flurry of activity, I would bet the number would decline substantially in less than 90 days. It would no longer be “safe” as the victims friends and family would be out for revenge – and everyone would know it.

    No! – I’m not suggesting we give it a try – just using the most extreme example as an illustration.

    Though I do suspect those that refuse to get out of the left lane would suddenly become far more courteous on the road.

  12. Judge Bethany Alvord has been appointed to the Appellate Court to replace Justice C. Ian McLachlan. First, no new taxes, now a picking a worthy jurist for an open seat, Rell is making some good decisions as of late.

    http://www.ctlawtribune.com/getarticle.aspx?ID=32918

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