Paper Comes to its Senses

Alert readers of the Stamford Advocate will note the return of columnist Sarah Darer Littman (you know her as Saramerica around here) to that paper this weekend. This shows a great deal of common sense on their part!

Her earlier relationship with the paper ended after she crossed Lee Whitnum in a column.

Here’s her latest column.

Advertisements

14 responses to “Paper Comes to its Senses

  1. The paper also gave this site some credit in their article on Lt. Gov. Fedele’s $142,000 driver.

  2. AndersonScooper

    Hey, having asked the original question, I’ll take the credit, while at the same time thanking Genghis for this awesome forum.

    After all the outrage over Amann’s proposed $120K, Donovan’s communication guy, and Williams’ driver, — I wish I had known the extent of the GOP’s fiscal ridiculousness before the Lt. Gov’s gratuitous budget talk appearance.

    How can Fedele, and Rell, seriously defend such a waste/abuse of tax dollars?

  3. Does Trooper Delia get to drive Mike’s Ferrari and, if he does, does he keep it under 65 mph?

    Just askin’.

  4. After all the outrage over Amann’s proposed $120K, Donovan’s communication guy, and Williams’ driver, — I wish I had known the extent of the GOP’s fiscal ridiculousness before the Lt. Gov’s gratuitous budget talk appearance.

    Hey, TrueBlue, quick question for you: had Connecticut not increased its minimum wage last year, would unemployment be (a) higher, (b) lower or (c) the same as it is right now? (Hint: choose (b).)

  5. Does Trooper Delia get to drive Mike’s Ferrari and, if he does, does he keep it under 65 mph?

    No – and in answer to #2. he doesn’t have to as agree w/it or not (I don’t) police are exempt from most traffic laws including speed limits, hands free cell, etc.

    I wish I had known the extent of the GOP’s fiscal ridiculousness before the Lt. Gov’s gratuitous budget talk appearance.

    Why?
    Do you think anyone aside from your own 7 followers gives a hoot what you think?

  6. The reporter for the Advocate gave a hoot and printed the story.

    Aside form the arrest of Ken Krayeske, it would be interesting to know how many other investigations of threats have been undertaken by whom and at what costs to taxpayers.

  7. AndersonScooper

    Does anyone know what the $142,000/year trooper/driver does on those days when Fedele doesn’t journey to Hartford?

  8. Does anyone know what the $142,000/year trooper/driver does on those days when Fedele doesn’t journey to Hartford?

    Are you ignoring my question (no. 4 above)?

  9. AndersonScooper

    Sorry Jack. I agree that if there were no minimum wages, everyone would be able to find work at $2-3/hour. (Yeah, I’d probably pay someone $16/day, $80/week, to babysit my dog. BTW, I’m not sure I’d go much higher than that.)

    Anyway, let’s all hail Jack Dobb and his ideology. If he had his way there’d be no unemployment, just shanty-towns, and America could rival Third World nations.

  10. Sorry Jack. I agree that if there were no minimum wages, everyone would be able to find work at $2-3/hour. (Yeah, I’d probably pay someone $16/day, $80/week, to babysit my dog. BTW, I’m not sure I’d go much higher than that.)

    Simple question. Would we have higher employment at a lower minimum wage, yes or no? Would New Haven be a shanty-town if there was readily available labor at $7 per hour? Yes or no? You and your liberal agenda are creating a wage floor that is legally preventing people from going to work and earning money for their families. I hope you’re proud of yourself, Ed.

  11. Simple question. Would we have higher employment at a lower minimum wage, yes or no?

    No. There is little real evidence showing that a raise in the minimum wage will lead to higher unemployment.

    Also, try living on $7/hr. Not fun.

  12. No. There is little real evidence showing that a raise in the minimum wage will lead to higher unemployment.

    That Vermont study does nothing to disprove the point that increasing the minimum wage increases unemployment. The question isn’t the unemployment in 2001 versus the unemployment in 1998; rather, it’s the unemployment in Year X with a higher minimum wage versus the unemployment in Year X with a lower minimum wage. The latter is always higher than the former.

  13. Your question was simplistic, so I gave you a simple answer. The more complicated answer is that studies suggest that employment would in fact be more likely to go down with a higher minimum wage– but only slightly. An increase of 10% would lead to disemployment of something bordering on 1-3%, if that. This is only statistical modeling, by the way. Reality tends to work out somewhat differently because the economy seems to adjust.

    Here’s another “simple” question for you, Jack: is the scenario you propose anywhere close to reality? If the minimum wage were lowered or abolished (bad idea–I’m sure even you can see why) would there suddenly be readily available labor for everyone?

    Or would the increase in employment be so slight that very few jobs would actually be created? Also, would those few jobs be worth having? Could someone support a family with them? Earning, say, $3/hr at a job instead of $7 isn’t exactly a way out of poverty–it’s a way to ensure someone stays firmly locked in it.

    I think you’re crusading against the wrong thing.

  14. Your question was simplistic, so I gave you a simple answer. The more complicated answer is that studies suggest that employment would in fact be more likely to go down with a higher minimum wage– but only slightly. An increase of 10% would lead to disemployment of something bordering on 1-3%, if that. This is only statistical modeling, by the way. Reality tends to work out somewhat differently because the economy seems to adjust.

    It depends how much supply of labor there is versus demand. Obviously, raising the minimum wage is going to cut demand for employment. (Well, in many places in the country, the effective minimum is higher than the mandated minimum wage, simply because there aren’t enough people working to work for $X per hour versus the number of jobs, so there, if the new minimum was also below the market minimum, there’s no real effect).

    If raising the minimum wage did NOT lead to less employment, then you could, according to your hypothesis, raise the minimum wage any amount, or raise it in increments in rapid succession, and not have higher unemploment.

    In some cases, raising the wages would result in very few people losing their jobs, in other cases, it’s going to cause a lot of people to lose their jobs. Just like any other pricing mechanism. In some cases, raising the price of fuel or beef or airline tickets would lead to a very small decrease in quantity demanded, in other cases, a lot. But it’s always something.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s