Dodd on Face the State

Sen. Dodd was on “Face the State” this weekend for the full half hour. Here’s the link.

(Dennis House mentions a quote from this site in the first question)

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19 responses to “Dodd on Face the State

  1. HAHAHAHAHA!!!!

    “Genghis Conn said…”

    hahaha…

    GC really hit the bigtime now! We better all start to watch our step around Mr. Important!

    hahaha…

    Congrats GC. That really is pretty cool… although seeing your handle on TV does start to get kinda ridiculous. hahaha… still awesome though!

  2. GC, seriously, that’s really cool!

    Have you considered starting to post under your real name, like they’re doing at a lot of the national blogs these days?

  3. AndersonScooper

    Connecticut Bob asks Genghis if he/she doesn’t want to start posting under his/her real name?

    Gotta love it.

    I presume like many of us it’s work issues and not wanting to potentially involve an employer in one’s political dialogue.

  4. I presume like many of us it’s work issues and not wanting to potentially involve an employer in one’s political dialogue.

    He shows up in the Courant and on TV as Mr. Lipton; why not here too?

  5. Connecticut Bob asks Genghis if he/she doesn’t want to start posting under his/her real name?

    As if “Bob” is his real name, yeah sure.

  6. Connecticut Bob asks Genghis if he/she doesn’t want to start posting under his/her real name?

    hahaha!!!

    I doubt GCs issue is his employer. Maybe it’s cuz I spend way too much time here, but… I’m pretty sure I know the city where he works, the type of organization for which he works and the department in that organization. And he’s had to use his real name when he gets “posted” in the hardcopy version of the Courant.

  7. I actually prefer using my real name. It forces me to think twice before offering my candid thoughts on topics, such as the AIG bonuses.

    Btw, having seen Dodd get “outraged” over the AIG bonuses, I again encourage CT Dems to dump Dodd. I’m absolutely furious over my tax dollars going to these guys:

    Anyone else considering joining the SEIU on Thursday to protest these bonuses? Remember… Dodd’s $850 billion bailout (which probably covers some of AIGs $180 billion bailout) gives discretion over executive compensation to Taxman Tim!

    And did everyone notice that after months of The Fed stonewalling Bloomberg News on their FOI requests… the first domino fell and AIG capitulated… who’s the #1 recipient of Hank Paulson’s $85 billion AIG bailout brainchild?

    Goldman Sachs – $12.9 billion

    Shocking!

  8. Have you considered starting to post under your real name, like they’re doing at a lot of the national blogs these days?

    I have. It isn’t like it’s some kind of secret.

    Then again, I’ve been doing it this way for four years, and people seem to remember the handle.

  9. I like the handle… very clever.

    Btw, who’s Redcoat?!

  10. Anyone else considering joining the SEIU on Thursday to protest these bonuses? Remember… Dodd’s $850 billion bailout (which probably covers some of AIGs $180 billion bailout) gives discretion over executive compensation to Taxman Tim!

    There’s nothing wrong with the bonuses, if they’re earned. There’s everything wrong with the government bailout. That’s the real problem: we shouldn’t have bailed out anyone, especially a private company like AIG.

    Congrats, Genghis. A nice (and well-earned) shot of legitimacy. Good work.

  11. Obama’s whole economic team (Bernanke, Geithner, Summers) needs to be fired. Geithner should probably be in jail.

    People need to be held accountable. Neither the bonuses nor bailouts should have happened.

  12. let me rephrase…

    I don’t want my tax dollars going to bonuses at AIG. And I don’t want my tax dollars going to help Paulson’s cronies at Goldman. And does anyone know if Paulson sold all his interests in Goldman prior to the bailout?

  13. Btw, having seen Dodd get “outraged” over the AIG bonuses, I again encourage CT Dems to dump Dodd. I’m absolutely furious over my tax dollars going to these guys:

    Barney Frank pretty much tossed Dodd under the bus yesterday claiming Dodd inserted a provision in the stimulus bill during conference that allowed for bonuses in place before feb 11 to be paid, apparently tailored to AIG. Dodd has taken $280K in campaign donations from AIG. Having been bought, the least. and honorable thing ,Dodd could do is stay bought.

  14. Barney Frank pretty much tossed Dodd under the bus yesterday claiming Dodd inserted a provision in the stimulus bill during conference that allowed for bonuses in place before feb 11 to be paid, apparently tailored to AIG. Dodd has taken $280K in campaign donations from AIG. Having been bought, the least. and honorable thing ,Dodd could do is stay bought.

    Wow – Blunder just follows blunder with Dodd. I hope he keeps it up and no one dares to primary him. He has become the gift that keeps giving.

  15. Then again, I’ve been doing it this way for four years, and people seem to remember the handle.

    Very true. But with the mainstream media quoting “Genghis Conn” rather than a real name, there’s always going to be a bit of condescension from journalists; although in this case, Dennis House was nothing like that.

    As for “Connecticut Bob”, yes I will acknowledge the wry irony of me bringing this up, but in my case, my handle is my “brand”, whereas this website here isn’t called Genhisconn.com. And whenever I’m interviewed, I always use my real name.

    Not only that, but my blog rarely deals with current issues in a totally serious manner. I tend to look for the odd twists or humor in a situation, and write about that. The only times I get quoted in the MSM is usually the result of one of my videos rather than my writing.

    I’m just making an observation here, GC. The MSM will tend to take you more seriously if you use a real name. For me, I don’t really give a crap. But for a higher profile website like CTLP, it’s important to get that respect. Remember how long it took the NY Times to even bring itself to mention “My Left Nutmeg” by name?

  16. The whole AIG bonus thing is quite complicated, and I don’t really know what to make of it, or to bonuses paid to bailed out firms in general.

    On the one hand, there’s the issue of paying bonuses to people who ran the companies into the ground, so they needed a government bailout. I fully understand that argument, and I sympathize with it.

    On the other hand, these financial institutions are quite complex entities, with lots of divisions. Some of them are profitable. So should the people in those departments not get their bonuses? Also, you run the risk of having the good people in the good departments be picked off by other banks. Yeah, not a lot of people are getting new jobs now. But if you’re really good — and some (not that many, but some) people are — you can. This would therefore then cause even more bailouts to be needed because the firms profitable divisions would be even less profitable.

    The retention bonuses are basically guarantees to employees to get paid a substantial chunk of their compensation to encourage them to stay. So let’s say instead of paying someone $20,000 a month, you pay them $15,000 per month, and then you say you’ll guarantee a $60,000 bonus three months after the end of the year. This means that if the employee leaves, they don’t get the bonus. It also means that if the employee leaves the day after the bonus, that employee has still forfeited a quarter of his next bonus. So they’re designed to lower turnover of employees. They are in the contract.

    These three issues — government money, good performers in profitable departments and contractual obligations — are all important. I think the best solution would have been to not bail out private companies. The bankruptcy process is actually quite efficient: bankruptcy allows companies to get out of contracts like the retention bonuses. Bankruptcy would allow the profitable divisions to get sold or spun off. The bankruptcy process has been refined over the years, where the stimulus process still hasn’t been all figured out.

    I think a lot of politiicians are justifiably upset by the bonuses, but at the same time, the answer isn’t that simple. The government getting this involved has really mucked things up. I think normal bankruptcy would have been a better option. There are obviously nuances here regarding how much of the market in CDSes AIG had, but this stimulus thing is a mess that has now cost $173 billion.

    I think the “too big to fail” problem is a serious problem. It’s one reason for the government to use regulation to prevent companies from dominating certain broad sectors, or even just getting so large that their downfall would have an inordinate impact on the economy.

  17. True enough, Bob, and whenever I do interviews I always use my real name as well, though the handle often will turn up.

  18. I’m just making an observation here, GC. The MSM will tend to take you more seriously if you use a real name. For me, I don’t really give a crap. But for a higher profile website like CTLP, it’s important to get that respect. Remember how long it took the NY Times to even bring itself to mention “My Left Nutmeg” by name?

    Even though I’m typing this on a blog right now, I hate the notion of blogging and (no offense, Genghis) I think mainstream journalism is diminished quite a bit when they use blogs like this as a source of information. To me, blogs have always just been a place to come together with other people interested in politics and either vent or argue. Then all of a sudden, certain national bloggers (cough Kos, Matt Stoller, etc) seemed to develop some sort of chip on their shoulder and overnight went from venting bloggers to serious public policy people. The number of hits their websites were getting went to their heads and they thought they now had this platform to actually influence the way government works.

    Maybe this is the Hamiltonian in me but I do not want to rely on citizens with no journalism experience for news. In the age of stupid shit like Twitter and YouTube, any idiot with a laptop or a camera can make an impact on a national issue and that is, to say the least, a scary thought.

    The death of mainstream newspapers and the rise in people relying on blogs such as this for news is something I think none of us clearly understand and GC getting a shout out on Face the State, while cool at first glance, is something that bothers me and perhaps should bother anyone interested in maintaining the system of checks and balances between mainstream media and government that has existed for centuries.

  19. Maybe this is the Hamiltonian in me but …

    It is definitely the Hamiltonian in you. And by the same token, one might argue, it is the Tom Paine in Chris Bigelow.

    Having attempted on a number of occasions to commit acts of actual journalism, I have enormous respect for what the professionals – particularly the good ones – do. So when they implicitly sanction what we do here – or at least what GC does – we might regard it as well with some legitimacy as easily as anything other interpretation.

    That said, while I regard the current state of the fourth estate as very troubling (and I write about it with some regularity), that they are paying attention to what is going on in this public square is not at all troubling. If House was citing GC as some sort of policy authority it would be different. But he was citing GC’s post for Dodd as an indicator of public sentiment. CTLP has of course become a forum for that, and GC is the primary Contributor to the conversation here.

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