Democrats: Our Budget is Only "Honest" Option

Democrats responded to GOP criticism of their budget today, defending it as the only balanced and “honest” option out there.

Sen. Majority Leader Martin Looney, D-New Haven, said spending cuts alone would not have been responsible. He said education funding and college campuses would have to closed in order to close the budget deficit if no new revenue was sought.
 
“The way you create meaning is to be responsible and make hard choices even though you know those choices will be opposed,” Looney said. “We are, to this point, the only ones dealing with reality and dealing with the hard facts that are before us.”
 
While Rell’s budget only asked for sacrifices to be made by certain segments of the population, Democrats said Friday that their budget asks for everyone to sacrifice including the wealthy and businesses. (Stuart)

This is the Democratic response, then, to insist that the governor is still living in la-la land, while they are the ones making the tough choices, and sharing the pain equally among every sector.

Democrats are still hoping to find savings from union concessions, among other things.

Senate Democrats released a list of “facts” and “fiction” today in defense of the budget. You can see it here (PDF).

Source
Stuart, Christine. “Democrats Respond To Republican Critics.” CT News Junkie 3 April, 2009.

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6 responses to “Democrats: Our Budget is Only "Honest" Option

  1. Senate Democrats released a list of “facts” and “fiction” today in defense of the budget. You can see it here (PDF).

    Wow, I read the release. Now I’m convinced.

    I honestly hope that that wasn’t put together by Donovan’s $160k PR flack.

  2. There is something to be said though for the fact that no budget proposals (not piece meal proposals, but comprehensive proposals that tackle the entire thing and balance it) have been put forth that address the deficit from the Republicans (Governor included). There has to be a reason why. Last year as the minority party they came up with a budget, why not this year? I hope they do. I’d sincerely like to see it (no snark).

  3. There is something to be said though for the fact that no budget proposals (not piece meal proposals, but comprehensive proposals that tackle the entire thing and balance it) have been put forth that address the deficit from the Republicans (Governor included). There has to be a reason why. Last year as the minority party they came up with a budget, why not this year? I hope they do. I’d sincerely like to see it (no snark).

    I’m with you.

  4. Last year as the minority party they came up with a budget, why not this year? I hope they do. I’d sincerely like to see it (no snark).

    You’re not the only ones, I’m sure. After getting served this pile, I’m sure CT residents would like to see something else too… you know, something that doesn’t raise their income taxes or force their companies to lay them off.

  5. Sen. Majority Leader Martin Looney, D-New Haven, said spending cuts alone would not have been responsible. …. (Stuart)

    Yea, but the place to start is spending cuts.

    Until the Permanant Commissions are abolished, I don’t want to pay one cent more in taxes. They are just simple, obvious evidence that necessary trimming hasn’t been done. Heck, if you can’t get rid of those, you are spineless and irresponsible.

  6. When legislators talk about closing college campuses…I have to ask, “So?”

    UConn was founded on the premise of:
    “Instead of filling the young men up with theoretical book learning, and a great quantity of science which may not be immediately available, at a cost beyond the means of most parents, it is proposed to have a school, at which the cost of tuition will be merely nominal ($25 a year) and the price of board very low (not over $2.50 or $3 a week for 36 weeks.)”

    Since it’s clear UConn has strayed far from that goal, maybe the best thing to do is for the State of Connecticut to simply IPO it off into a private institution, and invest the procedes in lowering the tuition at the remaining state colleges…errr, universities.

    We’re not going to have affordable college education in this nation unless we hammer away at the cost side of the equation. Student aid, particularly loans, is simply a way to shift costs. The same economics that caused an unreasonable and unproductive surge in home prices due to easy credit also work on school loans.

    Our public institutions have largely forgotten that their first and primary responsibility is affordability. So privatize them, let them suceede or fail on their own merits, and let’s open new schools which do remember what their mission is.

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