Pearson Exploring Democratic Primary

Some Democrats have come to the conclusion that the best way to save the U.S. Senate seat in 2010 is for a Democrat not named Chris Dodd to run for it. Roger Pearson has come to this conclusion as well, and you can see his first TV interview as a potential Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, which appeared on “Face the State” this Sunday, here. I’d be curious to know what you all think of Pearson.

You can also see an analysis section with yours truly here.

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17 responses to “Pearson Exploring Democratic Primary

  1. I’m checking, but I think this is the same person who ran for Congress in the Fourth back in the eighties. If he is, he did porrly, not impressing anybody

  2. I don’t know how any Democrat could watch his interview and think that somehow he would be a better candidate than Dodd with or without Dodd’s baggage.

    Pearson was not ready for primetime and would be quickly dispatched of in a primary.

    I would encourage my fellow Democrats on this site and all over the state to urge Pearson not to run. It is only going to be a waste of his and our time; Dodd has been in rough patch but he is going to be our party’s nominee next year and if we want to see the seat stay blue, let’s concentrate on uniting against the Republicans instead of wasting time on a know-nothing, long shot candidate who would get no more than 20% of the vote in a statewide primary.

  3. I’m checking, but I think this is the same person who ran for Congress in the Fourth back in the eighties. If he is, he did porrly, not impressing anybody

    He ran in 1988.

  4. Pearson supported Lamont in the Primary and then switched to Lieberman in the General. If he runs against Dodd and wins the Primary, and then Dodd decides to run as an independent (both astronomically unlikely scenarios), will Pearson support himself or Dodd in the General?

  5. Geez- Pearson was only First Selectman back in the early 80’s for 2 years, and only because the Mianus River Bridge fell down and everyone got pissed off at the incumbent for screwing up the response. He did not distinguish himself, except for an unfortunate event when he pulled over a motorist after he was defeated and got in trouble for impersonating a police officer. I would defy you to find a single active Democrat in Greenwich under the age of 60 who would recognize him on sight. God bless democracy because everyone has a right to run for any office in the land but please don’t confuse his exceptionally limited, decades old experience for something akin to a qualification.

  6. I would encourage my fellow Democrats on this site and all over the state to urge Pearson not to run. It is only going to be a waste of his and our time; Dodd has been in rough patch but he is going to be our party’s nominee next year and if we want to see the seat stay blue, let’s concentrate on uniting against the Republicans instead of wasting time on a know-nothing, long shot candidate who would get no more than 20% of the vote in a statewide primary.

    I think Dodd could stand to spend some time impressing the rank-and-file. There are a number of different ways he could choose to run — run to the right, run as an insider, etc — but my sense is that the best campaign Dodd could run would be one where he illustrates how much he did to bring about the change that people voted Democrats into office last year to get.

    After all, the public has moved to the left of the consensus even in the Democratic Senate caucus, certainly on economic issues. So a primary has the potential to do Dodd a world of good — help him focus on what the folks back home are clamoring for, instead of delivering some weak Evan Bayh bullshit.

  7. So a primary has the potential to do Dodd a world of good — help him focus on what the folks back home are clamoring for, instead of delivering some weak Evan Bayh bullshit.

    He could do that with or without a primary. He is going to look senatorial and rationale compared to a no-name Democrat who hasn’t held office since before I was born and has no money to self finance and a gang of Republicans out of step with a blue state electorate. Dodd needs to get more populist, let the voters know he can feel their anger, and he can do that without wasting his time on Pearson. Now, with that said, even if Pearson did run Dodd would entirely ignore him and Pearson would never gain the kind of traction Lamont did which forced Lieberman to recognize him. That is the good news. My point was that Pearson should just take the hint that no one cares about him and do whatever it is he has been doing since the 80s.

  8. Solid analysis, GC.

    Interesting to note just how many of these disapproving Connecticutians are in fact Democrats. With Dodd’s numbers as low as they are (lower than Lieberman’s in ’06), I would imagine that Democrats do indeed make up a considerable slice of the pie. That said, I don’t think his nomination is a guarantee regardless of a big quarter in the books.

    The numbers from a poll with Democratic alternatives (i.e. Lamont, Blumenthal) would surely hurt Dodd. The sooner such a poll is conducted, the better for Dodd’s challengers.

    Lamont could certainly pull off a victory. I wish he would get in the ring…

  9. Lamont could certainly pull off a victory. I wish he would get in the ring…

    Lamont did as well as he did in the general because of a certain person named Chris Dodd. Dodd did the right thing and supported the nominee even though that meant turning his back on an old friend, Lieberman. For Lamont to run against him now would be a slap in the face to Dodd, especially considering Lamont was also a supporter of Dodd’s presidential campaign last year.

    The notion that Blumenthal would have the brass to challenge Dodd to a primary makes me laugh.

    It’s Chris Dodd vs. Rob Simmons/Sam Caliguiri come November 2010.

  10. AndersonScooper

    Whatever happened to Lamont the outsider, the guy who called it as it was, and bucked the establishment to defeat the 18-year incumbent? Is he now just another fall-in-line Dem?

    Just wondering.

  11. Lamont did as well as he did in the general because of a certain person named Chris Dodd.

    You put far too much stock in political endorsements if you think that Dodd’s backing saw Lamont as far as it did in the general (it wasn’t all that impressive in the first place, in fact, it was a real let down in the wake of the primary).

    This curious state of ours saw the energized dyed-in-the-wools vote for Lamont in the general. In other words, the very same people who voted for him before Dodd’s endorsement.

    Per usual, the Jewish/Independent/Soft GOP vote broke for Liberman and Schlesinger…well…wasn’t that sad.

    I don’t deny that it would be a slap in the face to Dodd, but I’m one of the many out there who thinks the man deserves one.

  12. Per usual, the Jewish/Independent/Soft GOP vote broke for Liberman and Schlesinger…well…wasn’t that sad.

    Can you elaborate a bit more on the demographic you seem to think swung things in Lieberman’s favor over Lamont?

  13. I’m not sure what exactly calls for elaboration here…

    Exit polls showed that Lieberman won the Jewish vote (in fact, all of the religious vote), the Independents, and not just the soft GOP vote, but 70% of the entire Republican vote.

  14. He could do that with or without a primary. He is going to look senatorial and rationale compared to a no-name Democrat who hasn’t held office since before I was born and has no money to self finance and a gang of Republicans out of step with a blue state electorate. Dodd needs to get more populist, let the voters know he can feel their anger, and he can do that without wasting his time on Pearson.

    I think you’re right that a primary isn’t necessary to accomplish this, but primaries do seem to inspire our officeholders to show us what they’re really about.

  15. Roger Pearson seems like an interesting guy. Not quite a Senate contender and I don’t think Dodd will have any trouble making it through a Democratic Primary – with Pearson or any other as a challenger. He’ll also win the general election as people see how valuable he is as we rebuld the economy and get back on track. Don’t expect political winds to change in the next 2 years – and the numbers game is where it’s at if you want to see forward motion. We’ll have 59 dems ( with Franken) going into 2010 and 41 in the Vote No Party (VNP) – Not a great deal of retirements or flips on the radar screen yet so it will become critical for the Dems to hold the senate leadership base and expand the ranks at least by 1 if possible. Dodd is a senior member. He is valuable to Connecticut, Obama and any change plan. Lots of people and resources will rally around Dodd – for good reason -and you’ll see his numbers rise as more people see how important it will be to keep him in the Senate. And besides – It will take 20+ years for any new Senator to get in leadership – Simmons will be what 90 befor he gets to hold the bat in a game – assuming the VNP takes over again in a couple decades.
    Only 550 or so days till Election Day 2010 –

  16. Let’s see now. That interview lasted nine minutes and thirty-five seconds. Assuming Andy Warhol was right, Roger’s got five minutes and twenty five seconds left.

    This guy is Jim Amann, except less articulate and more clueless. Who is this guy’s base? His talking points sound like he’s been taking notes from the Republicans posting in the comments on CTLP.

    You can also see an analysis section with yours truly here.

    So, that half hour wasn’t a total loss…

  17. Bruce Rubenstein

    Pearson didnt seem Senate material to me…he seems not prepared on the relevant issues of today and didnt seem energetic. In addition ( and I dont know if its true) there was a post somewhere that Pearson disguised himself as a cop some years ago, involving an incident ? If anyone knws anything about that Id be interested to know more.

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