Rell to Veto Death Penalty Repeal

Story at CTNJ and many other places.

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16 responses to “Rell to Veto Death Penalty Repeal

  1. Clickety_Clak

    GC—House Democrats pushing to preserve $3.7 million Senate Dem slush fund while House GOP is fighting to use it as part of the mitigation package. Don’t know about you…but that annoys me.

  2. scanman1722

    Shocker.

  3. famillionaire

    Where the hell is the Catholic Church on this issue!?! Why aren’t they pushing for the repeal of the death penalty as hard as they fight against post-rape contraception, civil rights of gay americans or as hard as they fought against extending the statutue of limitations to prosecute sex offenders?

    It’s this kind of hypocrisy that has driven so many people away from the Church and towards a more personal relationship with God.

  4. scanman1722

    Where the hell is the Catholic Church on this issue!?! Why aren’t they pushing for the repeal of the death penalty as hard as they fight against post-rape contraception, civil rights of gay americans or as hard as they fought against extending the statutue of limitations to prosecute sex offenders?

    The death penalty has always been the lesser of the Catholic social causes compared to abortion and, lately, marriage. If you polled your local congregation, I’m sure the number of people who oppose abortion would be higher then the number who are against the death penalty.

  5. Bruce Rubenstein

    this still was historic…..19 votes is a new bar to overcome…

  6. Where the hell is the Catholic Church on this issue!?! Why aren’t they pushing for the repeal of the death penalty as hard as they fight against post-rape contraception, civil rights of gay americans or as hard as they fought against extending the statutue of limitations to prosecute sex offenders?

    The Catholic Church’s opinion on death penalty is not absolute, as William F. Buckley said…

    ‘the pope’s encyclical does not condemn capital punishment in absolute moral terms; what the encyclical asks is that the death penalty be exercised only in cases of “extreme gravity.” That means that prudence is to be consulted. This is sharply different from the church’s position on abortion, which is categorically rejected. A Catholic can in good conscience approve capital punishment for the guilty, but never capital punishment for the innocent.’

  7. famillionaire

    While I don’t agree with the logic or the opinion, thanks for that clarification, CTDude

  8. Capital punishment (Good Friday) is also kinda necessary to the entire existence of Christianity. Makes you wonder what Jesus is more upset about…that we consider that a good Friday or that many of his followers support the punitive measures of Ponchus Pilot?

  9. … but never capital punishment for the innocent.’

    I’m an admirer of Buckley for a number of reasons, but this is one of the devices he employed that deserves some derision. Precisely who does argue for capital punishment for the innocent? Feel free to volunteer your real name, address, phone number and email address below.

    Now, I know (and so we can dispense with the usual spewing of the obvious for the benefit of the choir) that his point is that the unborn are innocent. But no less a leading conservative light than Justice Scalia dismissively points out that the constitution makes no case for a fetus enjoying the protections of a born person (see his interview on 60 minutes, with Leslie Stahl I think, for this reference).

    But that is a quibble.

    What is important is that (we) Catholics should oppose the death penalty because we know that – all too often – the innocent are executed.

    It isn’t that we shouldn’t punish the guilty. It is that the death penalty is a blunt instrument when what we need is precision and certainty that remain beyond our grasp.

    But that is way too much common sense for wanna be Texans.

    And as usual, this Governor prefers appearance over the substance of leadership, even in matters of literal life and death.

  10. While there is room within Roman Catholic theology for the capital punishment, it should be noted that Gov. Rell is Episcopalian, and what is much more relevant is the resolutions of the Lambeth conferences.

    Resolution 33 of the 1988 Lambeth Conference, ” Urges the Church to speak out against…all governments who practice capital punishment”.

    It would seem that this is an opportune time for Episcopalian Priests and Bishops in Connecticut to speak out against capital punishment.

    http://www.lambethconference.org/resolutions/1988/1988-33.cfm

  11. Dempsey Dem

    I have lost track of what is and what isn’t politically correct. I was watching the Gov. Rell veto explanation on C-TV. Is she really standing in the middle of a cemetery, doing answering questions as to why the death penalty is good?

  12. A too brief discussion of Capital Punishment, deterrence and Catholic religious objections to CP: http://donpesci.blogspot.com/2009/05/common-sense-capital-punishment-and.html

  13. While the CT State Legislature hardly has an extra 16+hrs to waste on an issue like death penalty – not that it isnt important enough, but rather it comes with the ole’ guaranteed veto – it is always an interesting debate. The question about where the Catholic Church is, while appropriately responded to by CT Dude, is an absolutely fair question. Moreover, isn’t it imperative to delve deeply into the servitude of the legislature, especially on issues of conscience such as the death penalty or abortion.

    These two issues, while oft coupled together, really have zero relevance to one another. However, I think the most interesting aspect of this debate, not so much in the State Senate but more on the whole of the societal debate, is if the state has the right, and authority, to take life (which I firmly believe it does not, but do understand the converse of this argument) shouldn’t the state always, without exception or deviation, be right in this?

    One of the most damaging arguments the Senate Republican’s brought upon themselves in their seemingly endless debate, with themselves most of the time, was making the issue purely emotional. The Pettit murders were awful. The recent Wesleyan murder, also awful and, if so inclined, one could put together an argument that both of these crimes – regardless of who they were perpetrated by – are crimes against society. Naturally, when crimes of this horrific and heinous nature or brought to our attention we clamor for eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth. However, the genius of Themis is that she is completely void of emotion, but rather, rich with knowledge and prudence that can not be questioned. Where our justice system falters is that its prudence can indeed be questioned and this, in my estimation, is why the death penalty can not be handed down through the course of justice.

    Where Themis, the Greek God of justice and good counsel, was not without prudence, knowledge and empathy, she was indeed a God. Our peers, whether judge or jury, are, by their very definition of peer, with error. In the knowledge that our peers are imperfect, which I believe is widely understood to be truth, even for judges and juries, we can not allow the state to administer death. If an error is made in the administration of justice, whether that be a speeding ticket or a life in prison sentence, we – as both a society or an inmate – are provided the appropriate recourse through the process to either allow a release or a refund. And while time lost can never be repaid, it can be forgiven, and, moreover, the future of that former inmates life can be fulfilled with remembrance and forgiveness, forgiveness being awarded due solely because that formerly imprisoned inmate is released and alive.

    Where the state fails in the process of the administration of justice is when it wrongfully executes an innocent person. Most important is the fact that there isn’t a number attached to this. The state doesn’t get 25 people who were an “oops” or 10 or even 3. It doesn’t even get 1. The first time the state puts to death a person who is irrevocably innocent of the crime of which they were convicted the state has absolutely failed its constituents. The removal of an innocent life, by the state sponsored system of justice, completely and utterly fails the society which it seeks to protect. Because this has happened once, and unfortunately continues to happen, the death penalty is not and absolutely can not be an option in the course of justice.

  14. henryberry

    The debate on the death penalty in Connecticut and final rulings on this matter should be suspended until the problem of crime and corruption in the state legal system can be dealt with. From what I’ve encountered, the state legal system does not have the legitimacy, interest, or reliable procedures for dealing with this matter of life and death. I know firsthand how some Connecticut state law-enforcement officials will work determinedly, perversely, criminally, and corruptly to manufacture appearances so an innocent individual would look to be a criminal. Over the past several years after I filed a criminal complaint for theft against attorneys at a prominent Bridgeport law firm with offices in other major Connecticut cities, I have experienced and witnessed an illegal wiretap, malicious attempts to frame me for some sort of drug and/or sex crimes, threats, stalking, perjured affidavits, forgery, subornation of perjury, tampering with witnesses, tampering with evidence, witness intimidation, and demonization and defamation of me covertly and also by means of a longrunning “investigation” of me. In short, Connecticut state legal authorities with some involvement from local and Federal authorities have made every effort to cover-up a crime while at the same time make it appear an innocent individual is a known or probable criminal of the kind to require an extensive, prolonged commitment of state law-enforcement personnel and resources. The individuals involved in these crimes and this extensive, determined corruption have been given a free hand and openly or tacitly received support from others in the Connecticut legal system. Articles and links to chapters of my book HOW A $6,000 THEFT LED TO THE EXPOSURE OF CRIME AND CORRUPTION IN THE CONNECTICUT LEGAL SYSTEM documenting and relating much, but not all of this involved tale can be found at henryberryinct.blogspot.com

  15. And as usual, this Governor prefers appearance over the substance of leadership, even in matters of literal life and death.

    And as usual, Danny Malloy’s CLP mouthpiece finds a way to segue, however inartfully, from a discussion of what Catholics do or don’t believe to a cheap shot against Rell on behalf of … wait for it … Danny Malloy.

    /spam filter

  16. Once again, Don Williams does not have the votes from his own side to over ride a Rell veto. How can anyone ever use Williams and leadership in the same sentence?

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