Election Day Registration Passes House

The Courant reports that after a lengthy debate the House has passed Election Day registration by a vote of 81-65. About 30 Democrats broke ranks with their party’s leadership over the bill.

The bill will move on to the Senate. Gov. Rell doesn’t seem to have a firm opinion on the bill yet, according to CTNJ, though her predecessor vetoed a similar bill in 2003.

One thing learned in the Courant article: the dead are still apparently registered to vote in Waterbury, according to Rep. Selim Noujaim.

Advertisements

43 responses to “Election Day Registration Passes House

  1. There’s only one reason anyone would support this nonsense.

    So they and/or their confederates could more easily commit vote fraud.

  2. ACR, you know that’s not true.

  3. ACR, you know that’s not true.

    It is in fact the case and you know it.

    How many indictments do we need to string together to get your attention?

  4. I don’t agree that the point of this bill is to facilitate fraud but that is exactly what it does- but as a byproduct.

    The actual point of this bill is to facilitate the possibility that a vote might be cast by the most pliant, irresponsible individuals who are chronically indifferent to current events: stupid teenagers.

    They are certain that stupid teenagers would vote Democrat if they could only get their lazy asses to the polls. And they are right! Why pretend this is about anything else?

    Next year they could consider legislating free subscriptions to “omg!” or Amy Winehouse cds to these mental defects.

  5. easthartfordtaxpayer

    I can see why someone might think this is a good idea; I don’t.

    It’s my opinion that if a person is not knowledgeable enough to know they need to be registered to vote BEFORE the election than they can’t possibly know enough about the candidates they will be voting on to be good participants in our political system.

    This will turn into another machine by which the highest spending politicians can manipulate voter turnout. I want to see a higher percentage of knowledgeable voters and this is guaranteed to give us less.

    Regret is bad when you’ve made an uneducated decision on which mustard to buy for your cookout. Regret is disastrous when you’ve made an uneducated decision on the leaders of the greatest country in the world.

  6. There are dozens of reasons why one could show up at their polling place and be unable to vote — Registrars have the power to change your address or remove you (not just make you inactive, outright remove you) if they have an indication from a government agency (say the DMV) that your address has changed to one out of town. There are two dudes that I know of with the same name and date of birth, only one of whom gets to vote each year (because the two towns in which the men reside pluck them off the other town’s list, every damn cycle.) People might reasonably think they’ve remained registered at their old address if they don’t re-register at their new one — but that’s often not the case.

    The most common case is with people that don’t decide who they’re voting for until the final weekend — and don’t really think of registering until they decide who they want to support. Maybe that makes them less than “good participants in our political system” — but I don’t think our government has any place in judging who has the smarts to cast “good” votes.

    For fraud, I have no problem with making the penalties steep and enforcement harsh. But it’s not hard for someone to tamper with an election now if they’re committed to doing it. EDR doesn’t make it easier to register with fraudulent documents — someone wanting to stuff a ballot box would have planned ahead anyway. What it does do is allow more people to vote. Simple as that.

  7. BristolDem

    So they and/or their confederates could more easily commit vote fraud.

    Or you could use it as a chance to reach out to a new generation of Republican voters.

    But if you’d rather tell these kids that it’s ok for them to be able to go die in Iraq, but not vote, by all means, do so.

  8. There are dozens of reasons why one could show up at their polling place and be unable to vote — Registrars have the power to change your address or remove you (not just make you inactive, outright remove you) if they have an indication from a government agency (say the DMV) that your address has changed to one out of town. There are two dudes that I know of with the same name and date of birth, only one of whom gets to vote each year (because the two towns in which the men reside pluck them off the other town’s list, every damn cycle.) People might reasonably think they’ve remained registered at their old address if they don’t re-register at their new one — but that’s often not the case.

    If they know this happens every year, must they wait until the last possible day to try to correct it? We shouldn’t open the door for electoral fraud because your friends are lazy.

  9. We shouldn’t open the door for electoral fraud because your friends are lazy.

    Well put.

    Meanwhile; the Q-Poll is out showing among other things:

    “Gov. Jodi Rell gets a 73 – 20 percent approval rating, including 68 – 23 percent among Democrats.”

  10. Not to mention…

    Democratic U.S. Sen. Christopher Dodd continues to lag behind Republican rival Rob Simmons, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released this morning.

    Dodd, who has served in the Senate for close to 30 years, trails Simmons, 45 percent to 39 percent, the poll found.

    However, those numbers are an improvement over the 50 to 34 percent advantage Simmons held in the last Quinnipiac poll, which was released in early April, on the heels of the AIG bonus controversy.

    Dodd appears to have “stopped the bleeding,” Quinnipiac poll director Doug Schwartz said in a press release accompanying the poll results. Connecticut voters disapprove, 53 to 38, percent of the job the Democratic incumbent is doing, a gain over the 58 to 33 percent margin in the April 2, his lowest approval rating ever.

    http://www.courant.com/news/politics/hc-christopher-dodd-senate-quinnipiac-poll-0527,0,921128.story

  11. If they know this happens every year, must they wait until the last possible day to try to correct it? We shouldn’t open the door for electoral fraud because your friends are lazy.

    They don’t know, actually. One of them just is told at the polls that he is not registered each year, and goes home without voting (or voting a provisional ballot), as his voter record was reassigned to the other person *without his knowledge.* Learning that they have this problem, they now both re-register every October, but whoever registers *last* gets to vote, while the other doesn’t.

    Let me turn it around though — how does EDR open the door to fraud? If I wanted to vote in 10 different towns on election day, and wanted to go to the trouble of forging identity documents to do so, what’s stopping me from just doing so two weeks in advance and mailing my applications in?

  12. easthartfordtaxpayer

    Or you could use it as a chance to reach out to a new generation of Republican voters.

    I’m not sure how election day registration could be a party outreach tool other than maybe a party bus picking up disinterested person and taking them to the polls to register them in their party and suggest they vote their party line.

  13. Let me turn it around though — how does EDR open the door to fraud? If I wanted to vote in 10 different towns on election day, and wanted to go to the trouble of forging identity documents to do so, what’s stopping me from just doing so two weeks in advance and mailing my applications in?

    Your scenario would provide two more weeks of processing, verification, and confirmation of eligibility, and deter bum-rushing the election day staff with a bus load of people from God knows where, who are brandishing utility bills from an apartment they can’t locate on a map, and demanding to vote right then and there.

    The two-week period provides a much better chance at deterring fraud than EDO registration, and, as ACR has pointed out time and time again, there is still a great deal of election fraud taking place.

  14. Come to think of it, if you could get a matching name and DOB, you wouldn’t even need to make a fake ID to vote. Someone could just ask to examine “Jack Dobb’s registration application” in the town where you’re registered, then fill out an application in another town with that same info.

    If the ID # matched, the star indicating that this “fake Jack” needs to show ID would disappear, as the records show they’d already voted and shown their ID in the past. And of top of it, they would have successfully prevented *you* from voting, as you wouldn’t be notified at your old address of your new address change.

    Now, I don’t have any evidence that this has ever happened, but EDR wouldn’t make it any easier to do. What makes it hard to do is the fact that in the process, someone would have to commit multiple felonies, and who wants to be on the hook for all that jail time just to cast one or two extra votes? It’s pretty unlikely that one vote in a particular jurisdiction is going to change any outcomes, so why risk it?

  15. famillionaire

    Easier access to democracy. That’s the strongest argument for this bill and the strongest argument against in IMHO. Access is already easy, but it is not a spectator sport. You have to decide to get involved and take charge of your, your community’s and your country’s destiny.

    I do not believe that it is so that massive fraud can be committed – that conspiracy theory holds as much weight as the Freemasons rule the world theory.

    And regarding legitimate voting issues as MattW has pointed out, there are already safeguards in place that allow for election day challenges, so these red herrings are moot.

    Look, registering to vote in a timely manner is easy enough as it is. If we go to e-day registration, then we are left with a bloc of people who have not been contacted by the campaigns at all, who are essentially going in blind with little or no knowledge of the candidates or the issues.

    Voting is a right, but more importantly, it is a RESPONSIBILITY!

  16. Your scenario would provide two more weeks of processing, verification, and confirmation of eligibility, and deter bum-rushing the election day staff with a bus load of people from God knows where, who are brandishing utility bills from an apartment they can’t locate on a map, and demanding to vote right then and there.

    If there’s a driver’s license number on the form, the verification really ends right there. It doesn’t matter one bit if the number matches anything. Even if the letter comes back a couple days before the election, Registrars are hurtling around lining up polling place workers and materials for that last week, they don’t have the time to hunt down one fool’s address and information.

    Hell, you could flummox the whole goddamn system by writing an ambiguous number that could be a 1 or a 7. “Oh, I guess they live at #73 Main St, not #13!”

    I wish it weren’t so. I wish there was the funding for some kind of unit that investigated this year round. 100% audits. Double the number of Registrar staff. But that’s not where we’re at.

  17. If we go to e-day registration, then we are left with a bloc of people who have not been contacted by the campaigns at all, who are essentially going in blind with little or no knowledge of the candidates or the issues.

    The campaigns would act differently though, no?

  18. Does Rep. Noujaim think the dead will be registering on election day now? And to think that this “bloc” of late registrants have not been contacted by the campaigns is ridiculous. Do these people watch TV? If so, they have seen ads. Do they live in large urban areas? If so, they will be offered money by campaign workers to register and vote. Do they live in shelters? If so, they will be herded up by campaign workers and brought to the polls.
    The folks who fail to register can already cast a presidential ballot. I guess we just want their ill informed input lower on the ballot food chain.

  19. Thinking of it now, I might understand if the administrators of this here comment section wanted to zap a post or two of mine. I’ve spent some time in Registrars’ offices in the last month of the election cycle, so I know some of the details about how the process works. But my comments weren’t meant to be an instruction manual for how to game the system — just an illustration that someone who thinks it through a little really wouldn’t find it too difficult to vote fraudulently under the rules we have right now.

    My point is that convenience isn’t the limiting factor on fraud — criminal liability combined with the relatively low value of casting a fraudulent vote or two makes it an unattractive enterprise. I’d much rather knock on 300 doors over the last weekend than cook up a half dozen fake IDs — I’d get more votes for my candidate and not go to jail. Win!

  20. But my comments weren’t meant to be an instruction manual for how to game the system — just an illustration that someone who thinks it through a little really wouldn’t find it too difficult to vote fraudulently under the rules we have right now.

    Agreed. If your comments were meant to be an instruction manual, they would have begun and ended with absentee ballots!

  21. …deter bum-rushing the election day staff with a bus load of people from God knows where, who are brandishing utility bills from an apartment they can’t locate on a map, and demanding to vote right then and there.

    How would you sleep at night if you were the head of a massive criminal conspiracy on wheels intended to steal an election 40 votes at a time — and the only thing keeping your co-conspirators from turning on you was the fact that you once gave them a sandwich?

  22. AndersonScooper

    Matt, you need to suspend reality if you want to enter the world of the Connecticut right-winger.

    If they say it’s so, it must be so, and there is no argument they’re afraid to make!

  23. AndersonScooper

    New Q-poll released:
    http://www.quinnipiac.edu/x1296.xml?ReleaseID=1301

    Dodd now ahead of Caligiuri, down just six points to Rob Simmons. Job approval off the AIG bottom by five points.

    Rell’s numbers remain in the mid-70’s. I understand that they’ll drop as she vetoes some of the Dem legislation.
    Blumenthal weighs in at 78%, 80-7 amongst Independents.I’m still thinking, (like 33% of my fellow Democrats), that Dodd should retire in favor of Blummie, an act which would put a quick end to this fight.

    PS– Dodd beats Alpert by something like 44%-24%. Expect a big release from Merrick later today.

  24. famillionaire

    And to think that this “bloc” of late registrants have not been contacted by the campaigns is ridiculous. Do these people watch TV? If so, they have seen ads. Do they live in large urban areas? If so, they will be offered money by campaign workers to register and vote. Do they live in shelters? If so, they will be herded up by campaign workers and brought to the polls.
    The folks who fail to register can already cast a presidential ballot. I guess we just want their ill informed input lower on the ballot food chain.

    VERY few campaigns can afford to go on TV and most in CT with statistically insignificant and heavily target buys. And every year fewer and fewer campaigns are covered by the MSM.

    The rest of your comment is not worth addressing and shows your angry lack of knowledge.

    The campaigns would act differently though, no?

    The smart ones would not. They would continue to focus their way-too-limited resources on proven voters. There is not enough money for campaigns right now as it is – campaigns have to choose very early on which large blocs of registered voters they cannot afford to speak with. Sad, but true.

  25. Very few campaigns can go on TV? Do you even watch TV in even years during October? Between Congressional candidates, Senate when they run, National every four years, and now legislative with our tax dollars, it seems like every ad bloc contains two or three political ads.

    As for the rest of my “angry rant”, you are right. There is no such thing as election fraud, as machine politics driving out the vote a few dollars at a time. How could I be so silly as to make up the fact that campaign workers are walking around with cash on election day drumming up honest support. Where exactly did Sen. Lieberman’s shortfall of $344,000 in petty cash payments to volunteers end up in 06? Take off your novelty glasses with the lenses in the word “HOPE” and get a clue.

  26. famillionaire

    Very few campaigns can go on TV? Do you even watch TV in even years during October? Between Congressional candidates, Senate when they run, National every four years, and now legislative with our tax dollars, it seems like every ad bloc contains two or three political ads.

    Yes, VERY few. We are talking about same day registration, which essentially already exists for President. You may have noticed that the ones you cited are in fact, very few of the campaigns we vote on yearly. Only a handful of legislative candidates went on TV and with extremely limited and targeted buys.

    You said it yourself:

    The folks who fail to register can already cast a presidential ballot. I guess we just want their ill informed input lower on the ballot food chain.

    And yes, this sounds like an angry, racist or otherwise prejudicial rant:

    Do they live in large urban areas? If so, they will be offered money by campaign workers to register and vote. Do they live in shelters? If so, they will be herded up by campaign workers and brought to the polls.

  27. So which is it – very few, or ones that target their buys? Where I live, in 2008, I was seeing ads for POTUS, Congress, including candidates I couldn’t vote for because me and my TV weren’t even in their district….State Senate and State Rep. Along with political action group ads by the boatload. That is some mean targeting.

    And exactly who do we vote on yearly?

    Yes, VERY few. We are talking about same day registration, which essentially already exists for President. You may have noticed that the ones you cited are in fact, very few of the campaigns we vote on yearly. Only a handful of legislative candidates went on TV and with extremely limited and targeted buys.

    As for my angry racism, that’s a pretty easy attack on anyone who questions the machine politics and their GOTV methods. It’s all racist – just like anyone who opposes Obama is a racist, a person who opposes his SCOTUS nominee is a combo racist-sexist, and anyone who disagrees with you is a angry right winger. It still doesn’t answer the question about a system where $344k disappears to volunteers and no one bothers to investigate the fraud that it bought. I guess anyone who questions that must be a Nazi.

  28. scanman1722

    Honestly, if you are not responsible enough to register on time then you shouldn’t be allowed to vote. Moreover, who out there that doesn’t register to vote on time wakes up on Election Day after not paying attention to the whole campaign and says, “you know, I think I’ll go down and vote today.” It’s a joke.

    I’m all about fighting voter disenfranchisement but this bill is nothing more than a tool for the people in BOTH parties who will round up a bunch of ignorant people, shove them in a van, and take them to vote for their candidate.

    Having to register to vote by a deadline is not disenfranchsing; it’s common sense.

  29. Joe Sixpack

    How could Livvy Floren vote in favor of same day registration?

  30. Joe Sixpack

    So I’m not accused of being racist, I’m going to say the missing $344,000 from Lieberman went to buying lattes at the Guilford Starbucks and Appletini’s at Bricco in West Hartford Center.

  31. scanman1722

    So I’m not accused of being racist, I’m going to say the missing $344,000 from Lieberman went to buying lattes at the Guilford Starbucks and Appletini’s at Bricco in West Hartford Center.

    Exactly…. this bill just gave a whole new meaning to the notion of “walk around money.”

  32. famillionaire

    So which is it – very few, or ones that target their buys? Where I live, in 2008, I was seeing ads for POTUS, Congress, including candidates I couldn’t vote for because me and my TV weren’t even in their district….State Senate and State Rep. Along with political action group ads by the boatload. That is some mean targeting.

    Very few legislative campaigns bought tv – that’s a fact. Which ones did you see?

    And exactly who do we vote on yearly?

    Municipal elections.

    As for my angry racism, that’s a pretty easy attack on anyone who questions the machine politics and their GOTV methods….

    No, saying that persons who live in large urban areas are all offered money to vote and implying that persons in shelters will be herded like animals is racist and prejudice. Question methods all you want, like Lieberman’s $344k – that’s legitimate. And I don’t think anyone who questions Obama or his nominee is racist and those who follow this and other blogs know I am not one to call anyone who disagrees with me an “angry right winger” and I have never called anyone a Nazi. Take a deep breath.

  33. this bill is so overdue it is ridiculus. you’d thinnk we were still charging a poll tax to black people.

    the only reason to oppose this is because you want to keep young people and minorities from the polls.

    as for this stupid argument that that it allows illegal immigrants to vote, that just shows your racism. if you live in this country you should vote. i don’t recognize what people call “illegal” and “legal” residents. people from other countries who live here are every bit the citizens we all are. but the nazi crowd wants them to speak english and take an oath of loyalty. total garbage.

    in fact, america dominates the earth so completely, i think the peoples of all nations should participate in the election of our president. that way they would have a voice against the way we completely exploit and victimize them.

  34. This is great. We’re buying another auto company! Gosh, I hope Dodd gets behind this bill…

    http://money.cnn.com/2009/05/27/news/companies/gm_bond_offer/index.htm?postversion=2009052711

  35. How could Livvy Floren vote in favor of same day registration?

    every once in a while there is a repubic that gets it. in this case only one.

    look at the death penalty debate in the senate. if it weren’t for repubic senator roroback the ban wouldn’t have passed. he understood that all civilized nations don’t torture, don’t execute people.

  36. So I’m not accused of being racist, I’m going to say the missing $344,000 from Lieberman went to buying lattes at the Guilford Starbucks and Appletini’s at Bricco in West Hartford Center.

    what the hell is that supposed to mean? are you saying that only gay people have lattes and appletinis?

  37. scanman1722

    the only reason to oppose this is because you want to keep young people and minorities from the polls.

    …or because you think that if people want to participate in democracy they should be responsible enough to register to vote by a deadline that is the same for every single person regardless of age, gender, race, religion, etc. It’s not that difficult.

    To equate not being able to register on election day to their being a poll tax is absurd. If you missed the deadline voting apparently didn’t mean that much to you to begin with.

  38. How could Livvy Floren vote in favor of same day registration?

    every once in a while there is a repubic that gets it. in this case only one.

    More like someone who doesn’t understand the bill.

  39. Mr. Reality

    I agree with Matt W. that the penalties for voter fraud should be harsh. I also think they should be harsh for people who neglect their property. What do say about that Matt? Can we come together on that one?

  40. famillionaire

    I agree with Matt W. that the penalties for voter fraud should be harsh. I also think they should be harsh for people who neglect their property. What do say about that Matt? Can we come together on that one?

    I can certainly agree with that.

  41. Blight represents a health and safety threat to our municipalities. Properties that are not maintained can be a fire hazard, promote illegal activity and detrimentally effect the enjoyment of others’ properties.

    What kind of person would not take care of their property? Certainly not someone who posts here.

  42. AScooper

    Blumenthal weighs in at 78%, 80-7 amongst Independents.I’m still thinking, (like 33% of my fellow Democrats), that Dodd should retire in favor of Blummie, an act which would put a quick end to this fight.

    Only one small problem, Dodd’s king size ego will not allow him to walk away. Instead, he will be an anchor around the necks of the Democrats and set the stage for some big Republican victories in 2010.

  43. are you saying that only gay people have lattes and appletinis?

    I don’t know about appletinis…but when it comes to designer drinks, this gentleman seems to prefer ‘chocolatinis’

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s