Still no Budget Deal

No news on the budget front, not looking good at this point. For more about how it’s going to affect cities and towns, here’s an interview LocalOnlineNews.tv did with West Hartford Mayor Scott Slifka:

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/g6dHgY3eVwA%2Em4v%5D

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20 responses to “Still no Budget Deal

  1. The Democrats in the legislature can’t even agree among themselves on a budget since the sensible Democrats won’t support tax increases. It’s extremely unfortunate that the leaders refuse to accept this. The Governor is not to blame here no matter how they try to drag her into their mess.

  2. Brenda, I agree with your point on the Dems in Hartford. What good is having a super majority if you are afraid to use it? I don’t completely agree with your point on the Gov., however. She has the ability to use her bully pulpit and her 73 percent approval rating to forge a deal, but appears to only be interested in maintaining her popularity. Neither she nor the Dems have shown a willingness (or ability) to lead during this fiscal crisis.

  3. AndersonScooper

    Brenda,

    Most of the “sensible Democrats” you mention are posturing in the same manner as Jodi Rell. They don’t care about marginal tax increases, they care about their re-election.

    What’s going to happen is that this budget fiasco is going to continue on until we’re all beyond sick of it.

    And then our taxes are going to go up, as that was necessary from the get-go, as the State can’t engage in deficit spending. (and the massive lay-offs that you ‘wingers longed for were un-stomachable to the majority of us.)

  4. AndersonScooper

    this comment is reposted from an earlier thread, which is getting buried.

    Too bad we don’t have a Democrat as governor.

    Then the buck might stop somewhere, and perhpas we’d enjoy real accountability.

    Of course this comment will draw knee-jerk reactions from CTLP’s ‘wingers, claiming that a Democrat would have hiked taxes already. But that would not be the true dynamic, as a Democratic governor would be the person most reluctant to raise taxes, particularly heading into an election cycle. Think about it. He or she would wear those tax increases a la Weicker.

    Instead, under our current system, much of the power rests with the CT House and Senate leadership, whose names are probably known by less than 20% of the voting populace, and each of whom will never be voted out of office, regardless.

    That, and a weak Republican governor who has little power or influence over the Democratic super-majorities outside of her veto powers, and who, mark my words, now will say “yes” to the coming tax increases, –after having played out this sad charade over the last six months. (there will be a bunch of talk about having to forward, and then she’ll claim victory for having prevented bigger tax increases.)

    Honestly, has no one noticed that divided government hasn’t worked very well for Connecticut? What this state needs is a Democratic governor to knock heads and crack the whip in dealing with the Democratic legislature, and one who will take first-hand responsibility for the result.

  5. AndersonScooper

    PS– Wouldn’t Slifka make an excellent governor? I could happily say “Yes!” to entrusting him with the future of Connecticut. (or any of the West Hartford guys for that matter.)

  6. AndersonScooper

    Finally, Campaign Schiff announces the Schiff-ster is competitive with Dodd, which of course completely to the extent that people still don’t know him.

    Anyway I pledge $50 to the Schiff campaign. All we need is a real GOP primary, and not the fake campaign that Caligiuri is running.

  7. The most amusing aspect to a non-stop poster is when they have to dredge up old threads, i.e, a derangement ranging from “please, pretty please, respond….to….’I will NOT be ignored.’ ”

    Such silliness only eclipsed by using the ultimate in selectivity in musing about what some cannot stomach.

    Most can recall the Q-poll from earlier this year that most state residents cannot tolerate higher taxes as a means of solving the budget crisis, an actual fact based gastronomical equation.

  8. Instead, under our current system, much of the power rests with the CT House and Senate leadership….

    I actually agree with you, Poopy…. and what have they done with the super majority?

    After all, the Governor doesn’t even cast a vote for a budget. And she has been asking Donovan and Williams to act on a budget. So much for that…

  9. What this state needs is a Democratic governor to knock heads and crack the whip in dealing with the Democratic legislature, and one who will take first-hand responsibility for the result.

    There is no way that John Destefano would have cracked the whip in dealing with the Democratic legislature, unless he thought they weren’t increasing spending (and therefore taxes) fast enough. Seriously, if you looked at that guy’s proposals, he was not going to knock the heads of the Democrats in the legislature.

  10. wtfdnucsailor

    But Dan Malloy would knock those heads – First the various agency commissioners to wring as much as possible out of the governor’s proposal then actively working with the legislative leaders of both parties until a deal was reached that could be passed and signed by the governor. Unfortunately, we will have to wait for 2011 before that will happen.

  11. Jodi Rell is the type of politician who really doesn’t care about her “approval rating” rather she makes decisions on what she feels is right. It just so happens that a fairly large majority of the people agree with her.

  12. AndersonScooper

    Brenda, you mean like the Senate Vacancy law? (On which Rell flipped for the sake of her numbers!)

    The Rell administration is all popularity contest and very little leadership. Remember what happened in 2007, when Jodi proposed a 10% income tax hike to help bring about property tax relief? That would have been a great leap forward, but unfortunately Rell caved under pressure on her one big initiative. (Please name another…)

  13. Jodi Rell is the type of politician who really doesn’t care about her “approval rating” rather she makes decisions on what she feels is right. It just so happens that a fairly large majority of the people agree with her.

    Jodi Rell may have some sort of vague idea about certain issues, but she’s certainly no ideologue. And what she feels is right sort of changes a lot. Remember about 18 months or so ago, she had some sort of income tax increase proposal to offset some sort of higher property tax credit or something like that? Where the heck did that come from?

    During the 2006 election cycle, her website was basically devoid of any issues. It was quite astonishing, really. She had something about some vague support for the arts, she was going to reform some trash haulage issue, and there was some sort of lame energy discussion. John Destefano, on the other hand, had a website filled with detailed policy proposals. Sure, half of them involved repealing the law of supply and demand, and most of them were completely off the wall.

    Recall also in 2006 that Jodi Rell certainly didn’t push the Republican agenda, or any other agenda for that matter. While she sailed to reëlection, Democrats gained supermajorities in both houses. With her popularity, she should have been able to campaign more for certain Republican state legislators.

    Don’t get me wrong, I’m much happier with Rell than with John Destefano. But Rell seems to have very little focus. Signing that Senate vacancy bill, for instance. She spoke out against it several times, then signed the bill. Sure, it would have almsot certainly gotten overridden, but if she was doing what she thought was right, she would have taken the stand against the bill.

  14. Wow, pretty strange when Scooper and I are writing messages almsot simultaneously that bring up the exact same examples…

  15. AndersonScooper

    GMR.

    more and more you sound like the kind of Republican I could ultimately vote for. Well-rooted, less ideological, more compassionate, etc. Kind of like Lowell Weicker, or Howard Dean.

    And yes, I wish my taxes were lower.

  16. The Rell administration is all popularity contest and very little leadership. Remember what happened in 2007, when Jodi proposed a 10% income tax hike to help bring about property tax relief? That would have been a great leap forward, but unfortunately Rell caved under pressure on her one big initiative. (Please name another…)

    I can’t believe I’m the first to call you out on your use of the term “Great Leap Forward.”

    But yes, I think we can both agree that raising income taxes by 10% would have been a “Great Leap Forward.”

  17. The US Senate vacancy issue is a big “who cares.” Governor Rell has said repeatedly that she takes vetoes very seriously and like both of you said, it was going to be overridden so why bother?

    When’s the last time the Governor appointed a US Senator? I don’t think it has ever happened.

    Saying that she “flipped for the sake of her numbers” is just plain stupid. As I said, who REALLY cares?

    People and politicians change their minds, it’s a fact of life. It seems to me that one of the liberal heroes John Kerry was famous for that yet the lefties idolized him.

  18. People and politicians change their minds, it’s a fact of life. It seems to me that one of the liberal heroes John Kerry was famous for that yet the lefties idolized him.

    Not only that, but Kerry took his image and made it work for him via this restaurant chain.

  19. Jonathan Kantrowitz

    William Benton was appointed Senator from CT in 1949.

  20. gmr,

    “Recall also in 2006 that Jodi Rell certainly didn’t push the Republican agenda, or any other agenda for that matter. While she sailed to reëlection, Democrats gained supermajorities in both houses.”

    gmr,

    While what you say is very true, that was then, this is now. While the handwriting for our current fiscal mess both nationally and statewide was then on the wall in 2006, I am at a loss to know who in the General Assembly including Rell was really reading it? I do however believe more now, than I did then that she is someone who sincerely has the best interest of most residents of this state at heart.

    Back in 2006 IMO Rell foolishly thought that business as usual could go on with just some tweaking to exactly how that business was done. Again, IMO she naively believed she could work with people in the General Assembly who are limited to one dimensional thinking. IMO I think as a result she has since learned better.

    Now here in 2009 with the economic situation totally changed, she clearly understands that that changed situation requires a far different response than the business as usual logic which is the real root cause of this mess.

    I think most of us (like me) who rally here against higher taxes, are really rallying against blindly continuing the failed fiscal logic that one way or another has gotten us into the mess we find ourselves in today.

    Increasing taxes while we refuse to take the steps needed to bring wasteful spending properly under control, because we are told that every state program, or state job is today too important to cut, is to also say they are all also more important than say, health care. That makes no more sense than to think that to simply cut taxes without cutting wasteful spending at the same time solves anything either.

    In both these fractions that do not work, there are two different numerators. One is higher taxes, one is lower taxes. The common denominator in both is no meaningful wasteful spending cuts. I submit the real problem is clear. You cannot solve this mess from either revenue side if you refuse to meaningfully address the spending side as well.

    Those of us who are willing to think logically know that when we do get a budget deal it will have to contain some tax increases and speaking for myself I am willing to accept that as long as they are matched with real spending cuts at the same time.
    Here I mean real, not just assumed cuts. Not just deferring our unaffordable obligations like the pensions, but actually reducing obligations we clearly cannot pay for, no matter how much we increase our taxes. We need cuts just as real, and measurable, in actual dollars, as any increase in taxes.

    Lacking those real spending cuts I say why invest more good hard earned money into a very failed business model? I think 2009 Jodi Rell gets it and good for her. I think the 2009 General Assembly wants to pretend it’s still 2006 so it can once again avoid doing what must be done. Clearly those guys all failed grade school math.

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