Quote of the Day

“Everybody is going to have to make a compromise — given that [Democrats] control two-thirds of the legislature and the governor has the veto pen. We’re trying to find the common ground.”

–Sen. Dan Debicella (R), on the ongoing budget negotiations.

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9 responses to “Quote of the Day

  1. Dont’ worry GC,
    The legislature will rush something through so that they can all rush home to pat themselves on the back especially if they were successful in getting Obamanopoly money for their particular Town or City pork barrel project.

    http://www.stimuluswatch.org/project/by_state/CT

    Can everyone here find their Town?

  2. I’m glad to hear the two sides are chit-chatting, but from a partisan perspective, there is so much on the line that I hope the Republicans don’t blink this time.

    The Dems desperately want to raise taxes. But they want the cover of a “bipartisan deal” so that in 2010, they can say it wasn’t their fault that another x dozen businesses left the state, along with x dozen millionaires.

    So, let the leaders and the Governor sign off on the deal, so that the Dems can be sure it will not get vetoed. But if it includes anything but very minor tax increases, the Republicans should all — every one of them — vote against it. Then the blame for the resulting job losses and decreased investment can be laid where it belongs — on the D aisle.

  3. The role of Captain Obvious will be played by Senator Dan Debicella. Previously, he appeared as Sir Talkalot in a production of “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Filibuster.” Critics hailed that performance as, “excruciatingly long winded,” describing him as “a master of saying nothing at length.” Audiences statewide have said, “for the love of God, please stop talking.”

  4. So, let the leaders and the Governor sign off on the deal, so that the Dems can be sure it will not get vetoed. But if it includes anything but very minor tax increases, the Republicans should all — every one of them — vote against it. Then the blame for the resulting job losses and decreased investment can be laid where it belongs — on the D aisle.

    Vincent, you are so right!

  5. Then the blame for the resulting job losses and decreased investment can be laid where it belongs — on the D aisle.

    Unfortunately puf, he’s wrong. Let’s look at the numbers of Republicans in each chamber in the Legislature after each election:

    Numbers after the elections:
    2002 House: Republicans – 57, Democrats – 94
    2004 House: Republicans – 52, Democrats – 99
    2006 House: Republicans – 44, Democrats – 107
    2008 House: Republicans – 37, Democrats – 114

    2002 Senate: Republicans – 15, Democrats – 21
    2004 Senate: Republicans – 12, Democrats – 24
    2006 Senate: Republicans – 12, Democrats – 24
    2008 Senate: Republicans – 12, Democrats – 24

    I could go back further but the trend is clear. The Republican legislators have been decreasing each year in the Legislature since the recent high in 1994 where the Senate Republicans held a majority of 19 seats and the House numbers were somewhere in the 60s. The only uptick in the House R’s number was a plus four after the 2002 elections which was only caused by reapportionment (cities losing seats and the four newly created open seats that year were all won by Republicans).

  6. The Connecticut GOP always seems to choose the wrong strategy.

    Rather than keep knocking down the Democratic tax increases, they should grudgingly vote for them, and wait for the overwhelming public outcry in the next election.

    If Connecticut voters are truly against tax increases, then the Republicans will easily pick up dozens of seats.

    I can’t understand why they never choose this tactic. They must be terribly short-sighted.

    /snark off

  7. Rather than keep knocking down the Democratic tax increases, they should grudgingly vote for them, and wait for the overwhelming public outcry in the next election.

    I can’t understand why they never choose this tactic. They must be terribly short-sighted.

    It’s because they’re more interested in keeping what they’ve got now than getting something they want. Democrats do the same thing.

  8. The Connecticut GOP always seems to choose the wrong strategy.

    If Connecticut voters are truly against tax increases, then the Republicans will easily pick up dozens of seats.

    CT Bob, Republicans won’t sell out the principles even if it means losing elections. We don’t believe in higher taxes and should not support it. I however don’t disagree that your strategy may help Republicans pick up some seats.

    If you can please come up with a strategy that allows us to pick up seats without compromising our beliefs…..I would love to hear it!

  9. Voting for the tax increases is equal to conceding that they are a good thing. Plain and simple. If the Republicans want to stand for anything in the Northeast, it has to be law and order and fiscal restraint. If they do not hold these postures, they may as well submit to permanent runt status (as seen in Brenda’s data, above), and wave bye-bye to relevance. It’s time to either stand for something or retire. As Rahm Emmanuel put it, a crisis is too good to waste. The current fiscal crisis is an opportunity to show how we would do things differently, not just now, but for the next ten years. It’s time.

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