Is Jim Amann Done?

The news: Jim Amann’s gubernatorial campaign has raised only $8,000 this quarter.

The excuse:

In a phone interview Monday, Amann said he’s only raised about $8,000 during the last three months. Unapologetic about the small amount of money raised, Amann said he is the first ever candidate for governor under the new campaign finance laws.
 
“I am the guinea pig,” Amann said. (Stuart)

Unfortunately for the ex-Speaker of the House, that excuse doesn’t hold water.

The complaint is that he can’t raise money in amounts over $100, and that his rivals can raise money in amounts up to $375.

Let’s try the math. Dan Malloy raised $144,000 or so. If we apply the ratio between $375 and $100 to Malloy’s numbers, we’d expect Amann to raise about $38,000. The dollar amount restrictions aren’t the problem, here.

Worse, Amann has actually been campaigning, despite having next to no money. Jodi Rell didn’t campaign at all, she merely arched an eyebrow and raised more than three times what Amann did. Larry Cafero’s exploratory committee raised about $4,000, and he’s not even running for anything!

True, public financing does change things a bit, and dollar amounts raised don’t always give the same sort of insight into campaigns that they once did, but this sort of awful showing is impossible to ignore. It’s hard to see this as anything but a disaster. Even if Amann hadn’t (unwisely) transitioned from an exploratory run to a full-fledged candidate, I still don’t think he’d be keeping pace with Malloy or Bysiewicz.

Here’s the thing. Jim Amann needs to raise $250,000 to qualify for public financing. He needs to do that before the middle of next year. He needs to find a way to raise a lot of money in twelve months, and he has no money to do it right now.

Is Jim Amann’s campaign for governor over? Maybe not technically. I’m sure he’ll want to hang in there. But given the situation right now, it’ll take a miracle even to get him to the convention next year.

Source
Stuart, Christine. “
Amann: ‘I Am The Guinea Pig’ For New Campaign Finance Law
.” CT News Junkie 13 July, 2009.

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10 responses to “Is Jim Amann Done?

  1. GC – be nice to Crusher!

    If you’re not, he might drop out. And then what fun is the Governor’s race gonna be?? Personally, I’m looking forward to CTBob catching The Crush in a few good moments.

    This post does remind me of one of Sara’s old posts…

  2. Amann’s fundraising total is shockingly bad. Indeed, it’s downright embarrassing. Wasn’t his other job, in addition to being Speaker, to be a professional fundraiser? How can a former Speaker of the House not even get to $10,000?

    No wonder Pat Scully jumped ship…

    Amann is done which is sad because now the Democratic primary for Governor will be a retreading similar ground from ’06. I thought public financing would have brought in additional candidates. Maybe we’ll get Lamont, but no Williams, no DeStefano and no Wyman.

  3. AndersonScooper

    Noooooooo!

    Jim Amann isn’t done until Jim Amann says he’s done.

    Genghis, please change your title. You can’t run a guy out of a race just because of meaningless fundraising.

    What would we do without Jim Amann to kick around?

  4. I agree with ebpie. It’s unfortunate that more candidates aren’t getting into the race. But I disagree about it being surprising. $1 million for the primary and only another $3 million for the general is a pretty small warchest with which to take on an incumbent governor.

    This doesn’t apply to legislative races, but as far as the governor’s race is concerned, the public financing system is structured to protect the incumbent.

  5. Done? When did he begin?

  6. This doesn’t apply to legislative races, but as far as the governor’s race is concerned, the public financing system is structured to protect the incumbent.

    It indeed applies to Legislative races as well. Let’s face it, a serious challenger needs to spend MORE than the incumbent to attempt to level the playing field which is hugely slanted to any incumbent legislator if both the incumbent and the challenger are limited to spending the same amount of money.

    The challengers don’t have a “franking privilege” nor do they have Legislative Aides paid for with taxpayer dollars.

    There are MANY examples of Legislative races (pre public funding) where the challenger spent more money than the incumbent and still lost. They made the races closer than they would have been if both sides were limited to spending the same amount of money.

    Not only that, there are examples in 2008 where a challenger spend more money than the incumbent did (with those famous “organizational expenditures” otherwise known as union money and CCAG money) and they made a few races closer than they would have been. Funny thing though is they still lost anyway but like I said, it was closer than it would have been.

    It’s painfully obvious why we now have public financing, isn’t it? (incumbency protection by for all of those incumbents who voted for it as opposed to the holier-than-thou types with their “clean elections” line of BS).

  7. Well said,Brenda

    It’s painfully obvious why we now have public financing, isn’t it? (incumbency protection by for all of those incumbents who voted for it as opposed to the holier-than-thou types with their “clean elections” line of BS).

  8. “Is Jim Amann done?”

    Perish the thought!

  9. I’m sad to say a long time democrat I can not support John Amman. Here is the major reason why: 1. as speaker of the house he was fair (could have been much-much -much stronger speaker)

    My support will be behind one of the following three 1. Secretary of State Susan Bysiewicz, 2. State Comptroller Nancy Wyman or 3. Stamford Mayor Dan Malloy. They all have a very strong public record, on the job accomplishments are spectacular. They both speak up to the governor & are not afraid to criticize the governor policies.

    If the Democrats stay united when running against Governor Rell she will lose.

  10. That ol’ name recognition is workin’ out just great for Jimmy!

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