Seven Vetoes Overridden

The General Assembly has overridden seven of Gov. Rell’s vetoes, the most any legislature has overturned since the 1970s.

There were two really meaningful bills passed over the governor’s objections: the SustiNet board of directors bill and a bill that would require deficit disputes like the one between the governor’s office and the legislature this year to be settled by the comptroller.

On the one hand, the Democrats looked a lot more active than they have in a long while. It’s kind of a low bar, though.

But on the other hand, they could have done more. The second health care bill was defeated because Sen. Joan Hartley decided to kill the bill not by voting against it, but by leaving the building. Originally, 13 bills were possible overrides today.

Rell vetoed 20 bills this year.

So were there any winners today? Well, the Democratic leadership showed that it can hold the caucus together and accomplish something. However, the loss of the partnership bill is a blow, and the Democrats did not get as much done as was initially hoped.

The Republicans did not use parliamentary procedures to slow things down. But they didn’t accomplish anything at all, except that they stood and talked, and occupied a small number of chairs.

The majority of Gov. Rell’s vetoes survived the day, but she has had more vetoes overturned in a single session than any governor since the woeful Thomas Meskill. Plus, the one bill that really does take power from the executive branch, the bill that requires the comptroller to decide budget deficit disputes between the governor and legislature, passed.

Health care advocates did not really win, either. Sure, SustiNet passed. But the SustiNet bill is, to be frank, disappointing. It establishes a board of directors that will make recommendations to the legislature by the beginning of 2011. That’s it. It isn’t historic. It doesn’t actually establish anything useful. It can and probably will be ignored by the legislature in 2011–and that’s what bothers me.

Yes, it provides a framework. It’s a step. But it’s a very, very small step.

The pooling bill, which actually would have expanded coverage now, failed because Joan Hartley went home.

However, there were winners here today–600 janitors and their families will be allowed to keep their health care coverage.

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15 responses to “Seven Vetoes Overridden

  1. The Republicans did not use parliamentary procedures to slow things down. But they didn’t accomplish anything at all, except that they stood and talked, and occupied a small number of chairs.

    As I mentioned in my reply to scooper in the other post, the Republicans accomplished a GREAT DEAL on Monday because the Governor vetoed TWENTY bills this year and all the Democrats managed to override was SEVEN. That’s a pathetic 35% especially considering the Democrats hold veto-proof majorities in both chambers.

    So Chris, for you to say the Republicans “didn’t accomplish anything at all” is just plain stupid. Once again, your partisan side is showing through again loud and clear.

    Good thing that health care pooling bill got killed. Joan Hartley is 100% correct, we simply can’t afford it.

  2. Good thing that health care pooling bill got killed. Joan Hartley is 100% correct, we simply can’t afford it.

    Hartley taking a walk was a show. She made a deal made with other conservative Democrats and that allowed them to support a bill they otherwise would have never supported. Without Hartley, they knew their yes vote was meaningless so they simply threw Williams a little bone.

  3. Well it is good to see that Sen. McKinney has given up working for the people of Connecticut and is fully focused on his campaign for Congress; I hear Chris Healy, CTGOP staff, NRCC, etc were in Fairfield yesterday with him after the veto session. Circling the wagons, clearly scared that Frantz will run (http://www.myleftnutmeg.com/showDiary.do?diaryId=11584) I know most Republican’s hope he does!

    As I mentioned in my reply to scooper in the other post, the Republicans accomplished a GREAT DEAL on Monday because the Governor vetoed TWENTY bills this year and all the Democrats managed to override was SEVEN. That’s a pathetic 35% especially considering the Democrats hold veto-proof majorities in both chambers.

    Brenda sorry but that is typical CTGOP loser comments; we need to show fight and we need to show people that if you give Republican’s more votes in the Senate they will do the right thing. A fight would have been nice yesterday even with the same result. No one votes for Republican’s in CT because they do not give them any reason to vote for them; they have no fight, they have no backbone and in the Senate (Cafero clearly does in the House) they have no agenda/beliefs.

  4. Mr. Reality

    It’s posts like this eapoe that prove one thing…Democrats know that John McKinney entering the race means that Jim Himes is most likely a one term Congressman. Great to see you are getting all your Republican information from MLN. Very credible. Most Republicans huh?…laughable!

  5. It’s posts like this eapoe that prove one thing…Democrats know that John McKinney entering the race means that Jim Himes is most likely a one term Congressman. Great to see you are getting all your Republican information from MLN. Very credible. Most Republicans huh?…laughable!

    I have no idea what you are talking about Mr. Reality. None of what you wrote makes sense since I believe Himes is a loser too, I and the Republican’s I know believe Frantz is the guy.

  6. Most Democrats I know are very concerned with McKinney. In fact most of them say that Himes won’t win if he faces him. I haven’t heard any Republicans touting a Frantz candidacy. Maybe they are I just haven’t heard it.

  7. disgruntled_republican

    The Republicans did not use parliamentary procedures to slow things down. But they didn’t accomplish anything at all, except that they stood and talked, and occupied a small number of chairs.

    The problem with this comment is that had they used parliamentary procedure, as they have in the past, you would be critical of them for doing so, as you have in the past. Those poor Republicans in Hartford – it seems they are damned if they do, and damned if they don’t.

  8. The problem with this comment is that had they used parliamentary procedure, as they have in the past, you would be critical of them for doing so, as you have in the past. Those poor Republicans in Hartford – it seems they are damned if they do, and damned if they don’t.

    You seem to think that the only governing options available to the minority caucus are total nuclear-option style obstructionism and not showing up at all. They could also engage with the majority in good faith to write legislation.

    For example, in return for the guaranteed passage of his pooling concept, which in principle should be completely inoffensive to conservatives (it doesn’t even cut private insurance out of the loop!), I’m certain that Donovan would have accommodated some Republican thinking on how best to structure small business participation so as not to give any special advantages to any one sector of the economy.

    Instead, legislative Republicans are acting like displaced monarchs waiting to be restored to the throne, and have the royal servants whining about the interlopers.

    Snap out of it! There will be a Democratic majority for the next 5 years at least, so you can either try to contribute meaningfully to government or you can keep burning the old palace furniture for warmth.

  9. “Health care advocates did not really win, either. Sure, SustiNet passed. But the SustiNet bill is, to be frank, disappointing. It establishes a board of directors that will make recommendations to the legislature by the beginning of 2011. That’s it. It isn’t historic. It doesn’t actually establish anything useful. It can and probably will be ignored by the legislature in 2011–and that’s what bothers me. “

    GC,

    So, is the SustiNet glass three-quarters full, or one-quarter empty?

    To be clear: the SustiNet board will not simply make recommendations. The studies and research are done. The SustiNet board will develop specific mechanisms for funding and implementing the specific SustiNet reform plan, for final legislative approval.

    I share your wish that reforms in the bill would happen sooner. But comprehensive reform DOES take care and time.

    And do you seriously think any bill with an immediate price tag could have passed in this economy?

    But the real proof that the SustiNet glass is at LEAST three-quarters full? The for-big-profit-insurance barons went after it with all they had. THEY knew SustiNet is real. Too real, in fact, to lose.

    Do really believe that the SustiNet board’s recommendations will be ignored by the legislature? Gee – that’s exactly what I heard when the SustiNet bill was first unveiled. But, my oh my, just look how things turned out.

    So now I’ll let the right-wingers who appear to have nested in this blog have their nay-say. Just because SustiNet passed (and survived a Rell veto, of all things!) is no reason to stop trashing it, and trashing ALL health care reform, and trashing All government. Whine away!

    But it’s too great a day for me to play any more…

    Be happy and well.

  10. disgruntled_republican

    You seem to think that the only governing options available to the minority caucus are total nuclear-option style obstructionism and not showing up at all. They could also engage with the majority in good faith to write legislation.

    You realize this was a Veto-Override Session, right? You point may be valid (depending on your point of view) in a regular session but not in this instance.

    According to the Office of Legislative Management, who I think we can agree would know a thing or two on the subject, A Veto Session is defined as:
    If the governor vetoes any bills after a regular or special session ends, the secretary of the state calls a legislative session for the sole purpose of considering whether to override the veto.

  11. Cafero said “If Williams has the votes, let them vote.” He and McKinney seemed to stand by this pledge. Nothing wrong with being clear and honest about one’s intentions.

    As it stands, the Sustinet package will be a money pit, as has been the case with the plan in Mass., and the roll call vote will make it clear the Dems own it.

  12. Bruce Rubenstein

    I would have prefeered that the democrats put in place a single payer plan…realizing Rell would veto it..and then organized for an over-ride

  13. I would have prefeered that the democrats put in place a single payer plan…realizing Rell would veto it..and then organized for an over-ride

    Williams can’t get to 24 so it won’t happen under his leadership.

  14. As I mentioned in my reply to scooper in the other post, the Republicans accomplished a GREAT DEAL on Monday because the Governor vetoed TWENTY bills this year and all the Democrats managed to override was SEVEN. That’s a pathetic 35% especially considering the Democrats hold veto-proof majorities in both chambers.

    It depends what the 7 are versus what the other 13 are…

    Want to know what’s pathetic? It’s when Jodi Rell gets over 63% of the vote and can’t use some of her political capital to campaign more for Republicans running for state senate and the sstate house so that she ensures that Republicans can uphold vetos. In 2006, she didn’t campaign on any issues (John DeStefano was a terrible candidate, so she didn’t really need to do much except not be him). She could hve campaigned for a few Republican state senate candidates and state house canddiates. Sure, she’d have had to taken a stand on some issues, but that’s what governors do. I’d rather have had Rell getting say 54% but 14 Republicans in the state senate than what we ended up with: 63% but 12 Republicans.

  15. She could have campaigned for a few Republican state senate candidates and state house candidates.

    Where were you?

    She did that and more; she was everywhere at once.

    With a candidate at a fair, in someone’s backyard at a hotdog fund-raiser.

    Seriously; the woman put down a ton of miles and tried to show up whenever she could.

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