For Women's Equality Day, We Need Pad Sick Days Legislation

–by Linda Meric, Executive Director of 9to5, National Association of Working Women.

Eighty-nine years after women finally won the right to vote, we honor the past success of the women’s suffrage movement and recommit to today’s continuing fight for equality.

There is still much work to be done. Women still earn less than men, and are still more likely to live in poverty. The lack of workplace policies means it is still difficult for working women, particularly those earning low wages, to meet our dual responsibilities at work and at home. And, even though we’re in the toughest economic times in recent memory, there is still no federal legislation that guarantees the time to care for yourself or your family in times of illness without losing your pay or your job.

Even as we recognize the struggle that won women the right to vote, the fight to win a minimum labor standard of paid sick days is at full pitch. In Milwaukee, 9to5 has filed an appeal to a judge’s ruling to void the sick days ordinance passed by 70 percent of Milwaukee voters last November. And in Washington DC, the Healthy Families Act, federal legislation that would guarantee paid sick days to American workers, is moving in the Congress. 9to5’s members, activists and allies are contacting members of Congress, telling their stories, and helping to build awareness that paid sick days are good for working families, good for the flailing economy, good for business.

Visit www.9to5.org to learn more about how we organize women to speak out to end the pay gap, change work-family policy and win paid sick days.

On this Women’s Equality Day, the legacy of the suffragists who organized women to win the right to vote compels us to recommit to winning equality and justice for working women.

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4 responses to “For Women's Equality Day, We Need Pad Sick Days Legislation

  1. I know it’s off topic but, is Obama’s troop surge in Afghanistan working? I know the media and many on the left ignore the War since their guy was elected but…. Obama has continued Bush’s war policy in Iraq and also has raised the war ante in Afghanistan by sending 21,000 additional American troops. Didn’t Democrats in 2006 & 2008 run against war?

    To their credit and in a rare display of fairness, The New York Times is questioning if Afghanistan is Obama’s Vietnam?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/23/weekinreview/23baker.html

  2. 9to5’s members, activists and allies are contacting members of Congress, telling their stories, and helping to build awareness that paid sick days are good for working families, good for the flailing economy, good for business.

    I love it when people (members, activists and allies too!) that work at nonprofit organizations that try to force businesses to do things tell them that something is good for business. Yeah, we who work in the non profit world know so much better what’s good for business than the people who actually work in business.

    Paid sick days may be good for some businesses to offer in order to attract employees, not right for others.

    Maybe your position has some merit for society as a whole, but it is not necessarily good for business, just because a bunch of members, activists and allies might think it is. Countries where members, activists and allies run businesses according to what they know best don’t usually turn out that well.

    There is still much work to be done. Women still earn less than men, and are still more likely to live in poverty.

    Women make less than men because of the career paths chosen. However, careers dominated by women are also less likely to be eliminated during an economic downturn. The unemployment rate for women is 7.5% vs. 9.8% for men.

  3. Mmm. I believe the “Pad” in the heading is an unintentionally ironic typo?

  4. I used to work for a company that didn’t give paid sick days to some employees that were hard to cover if they didn’t come to work. Instead, the company paid us extra if we went so many days without calling in sick. I liked that system.

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