Larson Town Hall in West Hartford

A good report here from LocalOnlineNews.tv:

[blip.tv http://blip.tv/play/g6dHgZ2CNwA%2Em4v%5D

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4 responses to “Larson Town Hall in West Hartford

  1. Larson is so full of crap… revenue neutral? What the heck is this guy smoking??? I see his health plan covers hallucinogenic drugs.

    More lies from your friendly Congressman.

    He’d do well to fix bankrupt Medicare and Medicaid first.
    Both are programs that don’t even compensate doctors at a decent rate.
    Oh wait, maybe those programs are revenue neutral too.

  2. “…health plan covers hallucinogenic drugs..”

    About time I say!

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    Oh nuts……not the damn snakes again…..ahhhhhhhhh….

  3. Curious how Republicans never displayed any qualms about the hardly “revenue neutral” Bush tax cuts that resulted in the third highest federal debt/GDP ratio since the Korean War, and a more than 50% increase in the net federal debt BEFORE the financial crisis set in. Curious also how Republicans had no problems waging two wars (one completely unnecessary, the other at first necessary, but incompetently handled) while cutting taxes. Curious, too, how the Iraq War, that will cost us well over a trillion dollars according to analysis by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, never bothered conservatives.

    But when it comes to providing decent health care for all Americans, they scream that it must be revenue neutral. How dare anyone think of adding a single penny of deficit spending that might actually help average Americans and improve the health of our work force!

    Want to prop up Medicare? Let’s start by supporting President Obama’s proposal to eliminate the thoroughly unnecessary 12% subsidies to private insurers to siphon off Medicare beneficiaries, and bring them back into the government plan that has worked so well for more than four decades. Under President Bush, 22% of all Medicare beneficiaries were hived off into private insurance plans with substantially higher costs. And let’s also reverse the horrendously wasteful Medicare Part D plans that inflict substantially higher drug costs on seniors in the private plans than are necessary. Stopping the private plans from feeding at the government’s trough and using the government’s economies of scale to negotiate dramatically lower drug prices would save hundreds of billions over the next decade.

    Concerned about low reimbursement rates to doctors? Doctors aren’t. Most doctors across the country continue to accept and treat Medicare patients. Why? For one thing, the cash flow is excellent. While private insurance companies now deny 22% of all claims, resulting in high admin costs for the doctors and lousy cash flow, they can rely on Medicare to pay insurance claims promptly. Again, that is why almost all American doctors still eagerly participate in Medicare.

  4. Curious how Republicans never displayed any qualms about the hardly “revenue neutral” Bush tax cuts that resulted in the third highest federal debt/GDP ratio since the Korean War, and a more than 50% increase in the net federal debt BEFORE the financial crisis set in. Curious also how Republicans had no problems waging two wars (one completely unnecessary, the other at first necessary, but incompetently handled) while cutting taxes. Curious, too, how the Iraq War, that will cost us well over a trillion dollars according to analysis by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, never bothered conservatives.

    First, some conservatives were against the Iraq war, including Pat Buchanan, Robert Novak and many of the libertarian Republicans such as Ron Paul. However, I admit that the fiscal problem of the war was of a lesser concern to them than the policy reasons.

    Also, the wars will eventually end. I am not sure what the whole point of continuing to fight in Afghanistan is: those people are never going to have a modern, industrialized country. Whether it’s 2 years, 5 years, whatever, there’s an end in sight. With the healthcare proposals, there’s no implied or expected sunset.

    Check out this link for income tax receipts by year: http://www.taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/displayafact.cfm?Docid=203

    It shows that for individual income taxes, receipts were just over $1 trillion in 2000, they sank to $793B in 2003 and then were around $1.15 trillion in 2007 and 2008. Corporate taxes were $207B in 2000, and sank to $132B in 2003 but were at $370B in 2007. Now, there are some things going on her besides changes in rates. In the late 1990s, the dotcom bubble pushed income tax receipts way up, and as that bubble unwound, tax receipts were going to drop even if rates hadn’t been reduced (not as much, but the dotcom bubble was unsustainable). The housing bubble similarly increased tax receipts artificially in the mid 2000s. So in summary, under Bush, the overall impact of tax receipts were that individual taxes grew, but not as high as inflation + population growth. Corporate taxes, however, did outpace inflation + population growth.

    Income tax revenue as a percentage of GDP has been remarkably stable since WWII at about 20% of GDP: see http://www.taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/displayafact.cfm?Docid=203.

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